Undergraduate Courses Fall term 2017

 

 
                                                                Sociocultural Anthropology
                                                                         Archaeology
                                                                  Physical Anthropology
 

This schedule is subject to change

Please visit the Directory of Classes for times and classroom locations: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

Academic Calendar

For Cross-Registration Information refer to:  http://registrar.columbia.edu/content/cross-registration

Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH UN1002x The Interpretation of Culture. 3 pts. Audra Simpson.  The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies. Students are required to register for a discussion section.  Please check the Directory of Classes for a listing at:   http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

ANTH UN2004x Introduction to Social and Cultural Theory. 3 pts. John Pemberton. Introduces students to crucial theories of society and culture, paying particular attention to classic social theory of late-19th and 20th-century texts. Traces a trajectory through writings essential for an understanding of the social: from Saussure, Durkheim, Mauss, Marx, Freud, and Weber, on to the structuralist ethnographic elaboration of Claude Levi-Strauss, the historiographic reflections on modernity of Michel Foucault, and contemporary modes of socio-cultural analysis. Explored are questions of signification at the heart of anthropological inquiry, and to the historical contexts informing these questions.

ANTH UN2008x Film and Culture. 3 pts.  Michael Taussig.  This intellectually demanding course concerns the theory  of film in relation to seeing anew the problem of out-maneuvering power, common sense, narrative structures, and aesthetics. Films include: ethnographic film and documentary  such as "Too Many Captain Cooks," Juan Downey's "The Laughing Alligator," Jean Rouch's "Les Maitre Fous," and "Trobriand Cricket," as well as  early Soviet film, Surrealist film, films by indigenous Australian filmmakers, , Samuel Beckett's "Film," Senegal's Sembene's "Guelwaar", and Harry Smith's "Mahagonny" set in downtown NYC.

ANTH UN2015x Chinese Society and Culture. 3 pts. Myron Cohen.  Social organization and social change in China from late imperial times to the present. Major topics include family, kinship, community, stratification, and the relationships between the state and local society.

ANTH UN3008x Indian and Nigerian Film Cultures. 3 pts.  Brian Larkin.  This course provides an introduction to Hindi cinema, one of the oldest forms of popular cinema outside of the U.S., and Nigerian cinema, or Nollywood, one of the newest.  It examines questions of film form, the place of cinema in urban life, religion and cinema, and colonial and postcolonial life.  And it asks what does it mean to engage in the comparative analysis of cultural forms without constant reference to the West

ANTH UN3040x Anthropological Theory I. 4 pts. Lesley Sharp. A theoretical history of the discipline of anthropology, read through classic and contemporary texts.  A course requirement for the major at Barnard, preferably by the junior year, offered in fall semester only; open to others with Instructor’s permission only.  Prerequisite:  an introductory (1000 level) anthropology course.

ANTH UN3879x The Medical Imaginary. 4 pts. How might we speak of an imaginary within biomedicine? This course interrogates the ideological underpinnings of technocratic medicine in contexts that extend from the art of surgery to patient participation in experimental drug trials. Issues of scale will prove especially important in our efforts to track the medical imaginary from the whole, fleshy body to the molecular level. Key themes include everyday ethics; ways of seeing and knowing; suffering and hope; and subjectivity in a range of medical and sociomedical contexts. Open to anthropology majors; non-majors require instructor’s permission.  Enrollment limit is 15.

ANTH UN3939x The Anime Effect: Media and Technoculture in Japan. 4 pts. Marilyn Ivy. Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations.  Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment limit is 20.

ANTH UN3933x Arabia Imagined. 4 pts.  Brinkley Messick.  This course explores Arabia as a global phenomenon. It is organized around primary texts read in English translation. The site of the revelation of the Quran and the location of the sacred precincts of Islam, Arabia is the destination of pilgrimage and the direction of prayer for Muslims worldwide. It also is the locus of cultural expression ranging from the literature of the 1001 Nights to the broadcasts of Al Jazeera. We begin with themes of contemporary youth culture and political movements associated with the Arab Spring. Seminar paper.

ANTH UN3946x African Popular Culture. 4 pts. Brian Larkin.  This course examines a range of popular cultural forms that emerged from urban Africa and have come to both express and shape colonial and postcolonial African experience.Enrollment limit is 16.

ANTH UN3957x Ethnography of the Everyday. 4 pts. Rosalind Morris.  The 'Ethnography of the Everyday' offers students an opportunity to engage the discipline's methods and genres, and the ethico-philosophical questions about representativeness and exemplarity that subtend them.The course will consider the everyday as an alternative concept to 'culture' and habitus,' while looking at the ethnographic works that were informed by those ideas. Students will undertake weekly writing assignments as part of an investigation not only of method, but of aesthetics, expression, and representation in general. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment limit is 15.

ANTH UN3966x Culture and Mental Health. 4 pts. Karen Seeley. This course considers mental disturbance and its relief by examining historical, anthropological, psychoanalytic and psychiatric notions of self, suffering, and cure. After exploring the ways in which conceptions of mental suffering and abnormality are produced, we look at specific kinds of psychic disturbances and at various methods for their alleviation. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Limited to juniors & seniors. Enrollment limit is 20.

ANTH UN3989x Introduction to Urban Anthropology. 4 pts. Steven Gregory. This seminar is an introduction to the theory and methods that have been developed by anthropologists to study contemporary cities and urban cultures. Although anthropology has historically focused on the study of non-Western and largely rural societies, since the 1960s, anthropologists have increasingly directed attention to cities and urban cultures. During the course of the semester, we will examine such topics as: the politics of urban planning, development and land use; race, class, gender and urban inequality; urban migration and transnational communities; the symbolic economies of urban space; and street life. Readings will include the works of Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin, and Henri Lefebvre. Enrollment limit is 18.

ANTH UN3999x Senior Thesis Seminar in Anthropology. 4 pts.  Catherine Fennell.  Prerequisites: The instructor's permission. Students must have declared a major in Anthropology prior to registration. Students must have a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to be considered. Interested students must communicate/meet with thesis instructor in the previous spring about the possibility of taking the course during the upcoming academic year. Additionally, expect to discuss with the instructor at the end of the fall term whether your project has progressed far enough to be completed in the spring term. If it has not, you will exit the seminar after one semester, with a grade based on the work completed during the fall term.

This two-term course is a combination of a seminar and a workshop that will help you conduct research, write, and present an original honors thesis in anthropology. The first term of this course introduces a variety of approaches used to produce anthropological knowledge and writing; encourages students to think critically about the approaches they take to researching and writing by studying model texts with an eye to the ethics, constraints, and potentials of anthropological research and writing; and gives students practice in the seminar and workshop formats that are key to collegial exchange and refinement of ideas.,

During the first term, students complete a few short exercises that will culminate in a fully developed, 15-page project proposal, as well as a preliminary draft of one chapter of the senior thesis. The proposal will serve as the guide for completing the thesis during the spring semester. The spring sequence of the anthropology thesis seminar is a writing intensive continuation of the fall semester, in which students will have designed the research questions, prepared a full thesis proposal that will serve as a guide for the completion of the thesis or comparable senior capstone project, and written a draft of one chapter. Readings in the first semester will be geared toward exploring a variety of models of excellent anthropological or ethnographic work.  Only those students who expect to have completed the fall semester portion of the course are allowed to register for the spring; final enrollment is contingent upon successful completion of first semester requirements. Weekly meetings will be devoted to the collaborative refinement of drafts, as well as working through issues of writing (evidence, voice, authority etc). All enrolled students are required to present their project at a symposium in the late spring, and the final grade is based primarily on successful completion of the thesis/ capstone project.

Note: The senior thesis seminar is open to CC and GS majors in Anthropology only. It requires the instructor’s permission for registration. Students must have a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to be considered. Interested students should communicate with the thesis instructor and the director of undergraduate study in the previous spring about the possibility of taking the course during the upcoming academic year. Additionally, expect to discuss with the instructor at the end of the fall term whether your project has progressed far enough to be completed in the spring term. If it has not, you will exit the seminar after one semester, with a grade based on the work completed during the fall term.

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Archaeology

ANTH UN1007x The Origins of Human Society. 3 pts. Severin Fowles. An archaeological perspective on the evolution of human social life from the first bipedal step of our ape ancestors to the establishment of large sedentary villages. While traversing six million years and six continents, our explorations will lead us to consider such major issues as the development of human sexuality, the origin of language, the birth of "art" and religion, the domestication of plants and animals, and the foundations of social inequality. Designed for anyone who happens to be human. Students are required to register for a discussion section.  Please check the Directory of Classes for a listing at:   http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.  This course has a $25.00 laboratory fee.

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Biological/Physical Anthropology

Courses not offered fall term 2017

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Undergraduate Research Courses 

Undergraduate Independent Research Courses in Anthropology:  Please refer to the online directory of courses  http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/