Courses - Spring, Summer, Fall 2022

Detailed descriptions of Undergraduate and Graduate courses may be found under the accordion headings below. Additional information and registration details, including days and times, and classroom locations, may be obtained from the Course Directory and Vergil.


 

SPRING 2022 COURSE LISTINGS

Please refer to the Directory of Classes http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/ for the days and times the courses will be offered.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology UN1002y THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE. 3 pts.  Instructor: Naor Ben-Yehoyada. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies. Enrollment is limited to 90.  Registration for a discussion section is mandatory.  Refer to Directory of Courses http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

Anthropology UN1009y INTRO TO LANGUAGE & CULTURE.  3 pts. Instructor: Elizabeth M Green.  This is an introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, it focuses on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment. Enrollment is limited to 20. 

Anthropology UN2005y THE ETHNOGRAPHIC IMAGINATION.  3 pts. Instructor: Omer Shah. Introduction to the theory and practice of “ethnography”—the intensive study of peoples’ lives as shaped by social relations, cultural images, and historical forces. Considers through critical reading of various kinds of texts (classic ethnographies, histories, journalism, novels, films) the ways in which understanding, interpreting, and representing the lived words of people—at home or abroad, in one place or transnationally, in the past or the present—can be accomplished. Discussion section required.  Enrollment is limited to 90.  Registration for a discussion section is mandatory. Refer to Directory of Courses http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

Anthropology UN2141y FRONTIERS IMAGINARIES. 3 pts. Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli.  This course uses primary documents and supplemental readings from two “frontiers” in order to study how colonialism has created different conditions of the ancestral present; how archival “cores” effect the possibility of documenting ancestral heritability; and how text-based documentation mediate how different frontiers are imagined and governed. The course will focus on two frontier regions: the Alpine region of Trentino and the coastal region of the Northern Territory of Australia, centering on the turn of the 18th to 19th century. The course examines the dynamics between colonialism and liberal governance--how the European conquest of the western Atlantic and Pacific continues to transform modes of liberal governance long after the first colonial fleets disgorged their armies, explorers, and settlers. It approaches a turn in the politics of difference by tracking how two sets of clans have moved through historical forms of the ancestral present, namely, changing imaginaries of social form, time, and heritability; and how these imaginaries emerge from and materially sediment into human bodies and the more-than-human world. The clans are, on the one hand, the Simonaz clan, patronym, Povinelli, and Bartolot clan, patronym, Ambrosi from Carisolo, Trentino; and, on the other hand, the totemic clans of the Karrabing that stretch along the coastal region of Anson Bay, Northern Territory, Australia.  Enrollment is limited to 90.

Anthropology BC3102y AFRICAN URBANISM. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Larkin.  This class examines the production and experience of contemporary African urban life.  It examines emerging questions coming out of Africa about the nature of ‘ordinary’ cities; urban informality and the rise of so-called ‘slum urbanism’; urban infrastructures; religions and the production of enclave urbanism; transport and informal labor; and the sensory experience of ordinary urban life.  We will also explore different ways of understanding and representing the city including photography, film, sound, and art. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 29. 

Anthropology UN3160y THE BODY AND SOCIETY. 4 pts. Instructor: Gina Jae. As an introduction to the field of medical anthropology, this seminar addresses themes of health, affliction, and healing across sociocultural domains.  Concerns include critiques of biomedical, epidemiological and other models of disease and suffering; the entwinement of religion and healing; technocratic interventions in healthcare; and the sociomoral underpinnings of human life, death, and survival.  A 1000 level course in Anthropology is recommended as a prerequisite, although not required.  Non-Majors need instructor permission.  Enrollment limited to 16. 

Anthropology UN3465y WOMEN, GENDER POL-MUSLIM WORLD. 4 pts. Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod.  Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia. Course counts towards the Global Core requirement. Enrollment is limited to 90.

Anthropology UN3665y THE POLITICS OF CARE. 4 pts. Instructor: Gina Jae. 4 pts. What are the consequences of entrenched inequalities in the context of care? How might we (re)imagine associated practices as political projects? Wherein lie the origins of utopic and dystopic visions of daily survival? How might we track associated promises and failures as they travel across social hierarchies, nationalities, and geographies of care? And what do we mean when we speak of “care”? These questions define the scaffolding for this course. Our primary goals throughout this semester are threefold.  First, we begin by interrogating the meaning of “care” and its potential relevance as a political project in medical and other domains. Second, we will track care’s associated meanings and consequences across a range of contents, including urban and rural America, an Amazonia borderland, South Africa, France, and Mexico. Third, we will address temporal dimensions of care, as envisioned and experienced in the here-and-now, historically, and in a futuristic world of science fiction. Finally, and most importantly, we will remain alert to the relevance of domains of difference relevant to care, most notably race, gender, class, and species. Upper level seminar. Enrollment is limited to 16.

Anthropology UN3811y TOXIC. 4 pts. Instructor: Vanessa Agard-Jones.  It is no secret by now that we live in a toxic sea. Every day, in every place in this world, we are exposed to an unknown number of contaminants, including those in the places that we live, the air that we breathe, the foods that we eat, the water that we drink, the consumer products that we use, and in the social worlds that we navigate. While we are all exposed, the effects of these exposures are distributed in radically unequal patterns, and histories of racialization, coloniality, and gendered inequality are critical determinants of the risks to wellness that these toxic entanglements entail. Scientists use the term body burden to describe the accumulated, enduring amounts of harmful substances present in human bodies. In this course, we explore the global conditions that give rise to local body burdens, plumbing the history of toxicity as a category, the politics of toxic exposures, and the experience of toxic embodiment. Foregrounding uneven exposures and disproportionate effects, we ask how scientists and humanists, poets and political activists, have understood toxicity as a material and social phenomenon. We will turn our collective attention to the analysis of ethnographies, memoirs, maps, film, and photography, and students will also be charged with creating visual and narrative projects for representing body burden of their own.  Instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 14.  To apply, please contact Professor Agard-Jones at [email protected].

Anthropology UN3835y AIR MATTERS. 4 pts. Instructor: Maria Jose de Abreu. This course focuses on conceptualizing air across cultures, time and space. If western episteme has long relied on earthbound vocabularies in order to edify its modernizing project, what happens when we set to rethink its basic premises through aerial logics? Can we even suggest adopting an air perspective or point of view without falling back into those very earthbound terms on which knowledge has long been made to be grounded? Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, this course proposes to analyze plural histories of the air that have not been sufficiently acknowledged. Drawing on a variety of cultural and historical examples, each week will entail ungrounding air through a particular subject-matter: medical, legal, war, race, gender, religion, media and technology, pollution and climate change, design, art and architecture, cities and countryside, the future of masks, or exoplanet atmospheres Enrollment is limited to 18.

Anthropology BC3872y SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR II. 4 pts. Instructors:  Lesley Sharp, Gina A Jae, Brian Larkin and Camilla Sturm.  Prerequisites: Must complete ANTH BC3871x. Open Only to Barnard Anthropology Senior Majors. Offered every Spring. Discussion of research methods and planning and writing of a Senior Essay in Anthropology will accompany research on problems of interest to students, culminating in the writing of individual Senior Essays. The advisory system requires periodic consultation and discussion between the student and her adviser as well as the meeting of specific deadlines set by the department each semester.  Enrollment is limited to 25.

Anthropology UN3880y LISTENING: AN ETHNOGRAPHY OF SOUND. 4 pts. Instructor: John Pemberton. We explore the possibilities of an ethnography of sound through a range of listening encounters: in resonant urban soundscapes of the city and in natural soundscapes of acoustic ecology; from audible pasts and echoes of the present; through repetitive listening in the age of electronic reproduction, and mindful listening that retraces an uncanniness inherent in sound. Silence, noise, voice, chambers, reverberation, sound in its myriad manifestations and transmissions.  From the captured souls of Edison’s phonography, to everyday acoustical adventures, the course turns away from the screen and dominant epistemologies of the visual for an extended moment, and does so in pursuit of sonorous objects.  How is it that sound so moves us as we move within its world, and who or what then might the listening subject be?  Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology V3893y THE BOMB. 4 pts. Instructor: Karen Seeley.  This course investigates the social history of nuclear arms in the context of World War II and the Cold War, exploring their ramifications for subjects and societies. We consider historical, ethnographic, medical and psychiatric accounts of the bomb’s invention and fallout, including the unknowable bodily injuries caused by radiation and the ecological contamination inflicted on indigenous communities where atomic weapons were tested. Throughout the course, we investigate government propaganda designed to produce political subjects who both endorse and fear nuclear imperatives; who support expanding militarization and funding for weapons development; and who abide escalating political rhetorics of nuclear aggression. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

ANTH V3933y ARABIA IMAGINED. 4 pts. Instructor: Brinkley Messick. This course explores Arabia as a global phenomenon. It is organized around primary texts read in English translation. The site of the revelation of the Quran and the location of the sacred precincts of Islam, Arabia is the destination of pilgrimage and the direction of prayer for Muslims worldwide. It also is the locus of cultural expression ranging from the literature of the 1001 Nights to the broadcasts of Al Jazeera. We begin with themes of contemporary youth culture and political movements associated with the Arab Spring. Seminar paper.  CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement.  Enrollment limit is 30.

Anthropology V3939y THE ANIME EFFECT: MEDIA AND TECHNOCULTURE IN JAPAN. 4 pts. Instructor: Marilyn Ivy. Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology UN3947y TEXT, MAGIC, PERFORMANCE. 4 pts. Instructor: John Pemberton.  This course pursues interconnections linking text and performance in light of magic, ritual, possession, narration, and related articulations of power. Readings are drawn from classic theoretical writings, colonial fiction, and ethnographic accounts. Domains of inquiry include: spirit possession, trance states, séance, ritual performance, and related realms of cinematic projection, musical form, shadow theater, performative objects, and (other) things that move on their own, compellingly. Key theoretical concerns are subjectivity - particularly, the conjuring up and displacement of self in the form of the first-person singular I - and the haunting power of repetition. Retraced throughout the course are the uncanny shadows of a fully possessed subject --within ritual contexts and within everyday life. This course counts towards the Global Core requirement. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology UN3998y SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH. 2-6 pts.  Staff. Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted. Refer to Directory of Courses for a list of sections http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

Anthropology UN3999y SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY.   4 pts.  Instructor: Zoe Crossland.  Prerequisites: The instructors permission. Students must have declared a major in Anthropology prior to registration. Students must have a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to be considered. Interested students must communicate/meet with thesis instructor in the previous spring about the possibility of taking the course during the upcoming academic year. Additionally, expect to discuss with the instructor at the end of the fall term whether your project has progressed far enough to be completed in the spring term. If it has not, you will exit the seminar after one semester, with a grade based on the work completed during the fall term. This two-term course is a combination of a seminar and a workshop that will help you conduct research, write, and present an original senior thesis in anthropology. Students who write theses are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The first term of this course introduces a variety of approaches used to produce anthropological knowledge and writing; encourages students to think critically about the approaches they take to researching and writing by studying model texts with an eye to the ethics, constraints, and potentials of anthropological research and writing; and gives students practice in the seminar and workshop formats that are key to collegial exchange and refinement of ideas. During the first term, students complete a few short exercises that will culminate in a substantial draft of one discrete section of their senior project (18-20 pages) plus a detailed outline of the expected work that remains to be done (5 pages). The spring sequence of the anthropology thesis seminar is a writing intensive continuation of the fall semester, in which students will have designed the research questions, prepared a full thesis proposal that will serve as a guide for the completion of the thesis and written a draft of one chapter. Only those students who expect to have completed the fall semester portion of the course are allowed to register for the spring; final enrollment is contingent upon successful completion of first semester requirements. In spring semester, weekly meetings will be devoted to the collaborative refinement of drafts, as well as working through issues of writing (evidence, voice, authority etc.). All enrolled students are required to present their project at a symposium in the late spring, and the final grade is based primarily on successful completion of the thesis/ capstone project.  Enrollment limit is 15. Requirements: Students must have completed the requirements of the first semester of the sequence and seek instructor approval to enroll in the second.

Anthropology GU4123y HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 4 pts. Instructor: Brinkley Messick.  This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approaches of historical anthropology, in sources, methods and conceptualizations. In the development of this subfield one can track the general development of the discipline of Anthropology from an original expertise in the oral texts of non-literate societies to the contemporary interest in literate textual traditions.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GU4132y MENTAL HEALTH & ILLNESS IN POST/SOC. 4 pts.  Instructor: Svetlana Borodina. This seminar takes mental health and illness in socialist and postsocialist countries as objects of anthropological investigation. It explores the ways in which mental health care, diagnostics, suffering, and therapeutic systems are constituted by and constitutive of the post/socialist cultural, political, and socioeconomic contexts. Topics include critical approaches to psychiatric diagnostics; the development of the Soviet psychiatric complex, neuropharmaceuticals, and addiction treatment practice; the constitution and treatment of mental disabilities; institutional and communal mental healthcare; deinstitutionalization; experimental treatments; healing and injurious socioeconomic and political forces; social abandonment and death. Class readings will present a mixture of theoretical texts and ethnographic/historical material from post/socialist regions. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GU4277y TOPICS IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST. 3 pts. Instructor: Nadia Abu El-Haj. This seminar is organized around a series of topics/conversations central to contemporary anthropology and Middle East Studies. Divided into four sections, the intellectual and political themes and debates nevertheless overlap, and the course is designed to consider not just the intellectual contours of the debates but also their political stakes in the here and now. We begin with a discussion of secularism/the secular; move to consider War, Revolution and their Political Horizons; settler-colonialism as a framework for analyzing Palestine/Israel, and finally, the politics, promise, and perils of history and the archive. Throughout we read texts written not just by anthropologists, but also, among others, by historians, literary and social theorists. Thinking about and through comparative frames is crucial to the design of the class.  The permission of the instructor is required.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GU4283y ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE SISTER. 4 pts. Instructor: Rosalind Morris. Classical anthropological theory placed the muted sister at its core, in a theory of kinship originating in the traffic of women among men. Political theory placed the invisible sister at its core by coding democracy as fraternity. Psychoanalytic theory placed the forbidden sister at its core with the theory of incest taboo. Tragic theory placed the self-effacing sister at its core in the Sophoclean figures of Antigone and Ismene. Popular (Hollywood) cinematic production placed the absent sister at its core, with its relentless circulation of narratives in which a ‘band of brothers’ finds its moral purpose in the rescue of someone else’s sister. And yet, and within these traditions, the sister arose in the interstices as a phantasmatic figure of extraterritorial and insurrectionary possibility. If feminisms have, on occasion, attempted to both mobilize and contain this possibility in a discourse of sisterhood, much more remains to be thought. This course explores the figure of the sister in its muted, invisible, forbidden, self-effacing and absented forms—and moves to consider the radical possibilities that emerged therefrom in Social and Political Theory, Literary Fiction, Drama and Cinema.  Enrollment is limited to 15.  The instructor’s permission is required.  Priority given to Doctoral students in Anthropology and/or Literature Programs.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

Anthropology UN2028y THINK LIKE AN ARCHAEOLOGIST: INTRODUCTION TO METHOD AND THEORY. 4 pts. Instructor: Hannah Chazin. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to methods and theory in archaeology – by exploring how archaeologists work to create narratives about the past (and the present) on the basis on the material remains of the past. The course begins with a consideration of how archaeologists deal with the remains of the past in the present: What are archaeological sites and how do we ‘discover’ them? How do archaeologists ‘read’ or analyze sites and artifacts? From there, we will turn to the question of how archaeologists interpret these materials traces, in order to create narratives about life in the past. After a review of the historical development of theoretical approaches in archaeological interpretation, the course will consider contemporary approaches to interpreting the past.  Enrollment is limited to 60.  $25 Anthropology Lab Fee.

Anthropology UN3007y HOLY LANDS: UNHOLY HISTORIES: ARCHAEOLOGY BEFORE THE BIBLE. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Boyd. This course provides (1) a critical overview of the politics of archaeology in the Middle East, particularly Palestine-Israel, and (2) a detailed survey of the prehistory of the region from earliest times to the beginnings of settled village life around 8000 years ago. It is designed to appeal not only to archaeologists, but also to historians, and to students interested in both the Ancient Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Studies. By the end of the course, students should be aware of the major issues and debates which characterize the archaeology of the region, and should have a good grasp of the historical and political circumstances under which Middle Eastern prehistory has developed over the past 150 years. Enrollment is limited to 30.

Anthropology BC3223y Gender ARCHAEOLXGY. 3 pts. Instructor: Camilla Sturm. This seminar critically reexamines the ancient world from the perspective of gender archaeology. Though the seedlings of gender archaeology were first sown by of feminist archaeologists during the 70’s and 80’s, this approach involves far more than simply ‘womanizing’ androcentric narratives of past. Rather, gender archaeology criticizes interpretations of the past that transplant contemporary social roles onto the archaeological past, casting the divisions and inequalities of today as both timeless and natural. This class challenges the idea of a singular past, instead championing a turn towards multiple, rich, messy, intersectional pasts. The ‘x’ in ‘archaeolxgy’ is an explicit signal of our focus on this diversity of pasts and a call for a more inclusive field of practice today.  

Anthropology GU4481y SCI & ART IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION. 4 pts. Instructor: Zoe Crossland and Co-instructor: Tracy Molis. Archaeology has provided a rich imaginative resource for many artists, who have found inspiration in the discipline’s material engagement with the past, its evocation of absent presences, and its strange juxtaposition of practical activity and textual narrative. In this course we continue the exploration of art’s intersections with archaeology, but we take an alternate starting point. Scientific illustration has been a key part of archaeological work since the discipline’s origins in the antiquarian investigations of the 16th and 17th centuries. These antiquarian records drew upon techniques that were elaborated during the Renaissance and many of these illustrative forms remain relevant today. Enrollment is limited to 17.

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGICAL/PHYISCAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4148y HUMAN SKELETAL BIOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Ralph Holloway.  Recommended for archaeology and physical anthropology students, pre-meds, and biology majors interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of bones. Other primate skeletal materials and fossil casts used for comparative study.   Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 8.

 

CROSS-LISTED CLASSES:

HISTORY UN2978y SCIENCE AND PSEUDOSCIENCE. 4 pts. Instructors:  Pamela Smith and Stuart J Firestein.  During the 2020 US presidential election and the years of the COVID-19 pandemic, science and “scientific truths” were fiercely contested. This course provides a historical perspective on the issues at stake. The course begins with an historical account of how areas of natural knowledge, such as astrology, alchemy, and “natural magic,” which were central components of an educated person’s view of the world in early modern Europe, became marginalized, while a new philosophy of nature (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality. Historical developments examined in this course out of which this new understanding of nature emerged include the rise of the centralized state, religious reform, and European expansion. The course uses this historical account to show how science and pseudoscience developed in tandem in the period from 1400 to 1800. This historical account equips students to examine contemporary issues of expertise, the social construction of science, pluralism in science, certainty and uncertainty in science, as well as critical engagement with contemporary technologies.  Enrollment is limited to 75. 

Please consult the Directory of Classes http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/ for the days and times the courses will be offered.

GRADUATE COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4123y HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY.  4 pts. Instructor:  Brinkley Messick.  This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approaches of historical anthropology, in sources, methods and conceptualizations. In the development of this subfield one can track the general development of the discipline of Anthropology from an original expertise in the oral texts of non-literate societies to the contemporary interest in literate textual traditions.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GU4132y MENTAL HEALTH & ILLNESS IN POST/SOC. 4 pts. Instructor: Svetlana Borodina.  This seminar takes mental health and illness in socialist and postsocialist countries as objects of anthropological investigation. It explores the ways in which mental health care, diagnostics, suffering, and therapeutic systems are constituted by and constitutive of the post/socialist cultural, political, and socioeconomic contexts. Topics include critical approaches to psychiatric diagnostics; the development of the Soviet psychiatric complex, neuropharmaceuticals, and addiction treatment practice; the constitution and treatment of mental disabilities; institutional and communal mental healthcare; deinstitutionalization; experimental treatments; healing and injurious socioeconomic and political forces; social abandonment and death. Class readings will present a mixture of theoretical texts and ethnographic/historical material from post/socialist regions. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GU4277y TOPICS IN THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE EAST. 3 pts. Instructor: Nadia Abu El-Haj. This seminar is organized around a series of topics/conversations central to contemporary anthropology and Middle East Studies. Divided into four sections, the intellectual and political themes and debates nevertheless overlap, and the course is designed to consider not just the intellectual contours of the debates but also their political stakes in the here and now. We begin with a discussion of secularism/the secular; move to consider War, Revolution and their Political Horizons; settler-colonialism as a framework for analyzing Palestine/Israel, and finally, the politics, promise, and perils of history and the archive. Throughout we read texts written not just by anthropologists, but also, among others, by historians, literary and social theorists. Thinking about and through comparative frames is crucial to the design of the class.  The permission of the instructor is required.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GU4283y ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE SISTER.  4 pts. Instructor: Rosalind Morris. Classical anthropological theory placed the muted sister at its core, in a theory of kinship originating in the traffic of women among men. Political theory placed the invisible sister at its core by coding democracy as fraternity. Psychoanalytic theory placed the forbidden sister at its core with the theory of incest taboo. Tragic theory placed the self-effacing sister at its core in the Sophoclean figures of Antigone and Ismene. Popular (Hollywood) cinematic production placed the absent sister at its core, with its relentless circulation of narratives in which a ‘band of brothers’ finds its moral purpose in the rescue of someone else’s sister. And yet, and within these traditions, the sister arose in the interstices as a phantasmatic figure of extraterritorial and insurrectionary possibility. If feminisms have, on occasion, attempted to both mobilize and contain this possibility in a discourse of sisterhood, much more remains to be thought. This course explores the figure of the sister in its muted, invisible, forbidden, self-effacing and absented forms—and moves to consider the radical possibilities that emerged therefrom in Social and Political Theory, Literary Fiction, Drama and Cinema.  Enrollment is limited to 15. The instructor’s permission is required.  Priority given to Doctoral students in Anthropology and/or Literature Programs.

Anthropology GR6055y SECOND-YEAR DOCTORAL PROPOSAL SEMINAR. 3 pts.  Instructor: Audra Simpson. Prerequisites: 2ND YEAR PHD STATUS IN GOOD STANDING.  Corequisites: ANTH G6205 Within this seminar, one will master the art of research design and proposal writing, with special emphasis on the skills involved in writing a dissertation prospectus and research proposals that target a range of external funding sources. Foci include: bibliography development; how one crafts and defends a research problem; the parameters of human subjects research - certification; and the key components of grant proposal design. Required of, and limited to, all Second Year PHD anthropology students.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

Anthropology GR6067y LANGUAGE AND ITS LIMITS.  3 pts.  Instructor: Elizabeth M Green.  Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 12. 

Anthropology GR6079y READING, WRITING, ETHNOGRAPHY.  3 pts.  Instructor: Rosalind Morris.  “Reading, Writing, Ethnography” undertakes a survey of exemplary texts in order to explore the histories, genre conventions and experimental forms for writing ethnography.  The course focuses on the monograph form, and is especially concerned with the ways in which empirical observation is made the ground of theoretical abstraction and generalizing claims. Additionally, it examines the relationship between different theoretical and aesthetic movements as these have influenced the writings of anthropologists and those whose work can be considered to have an anthropological ambition—even when they have not been formally trained in anthropology.  We will examine the influence of various modernisms—realist and surrealist—on the discipline, as well as the sometimes awkward relations between structuralist, psychoanalytic, and postcolonial theory as they have (and have not) been realized in the writing projects of ethnographers.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GR6102y SEMIOTICS ANTHROPOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli.  This course examines the canonical texts of modern semiology and semiotics from the perspective of anthropological methods and theories. Beginning with an extensive examination of the works of Ferdinand de Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce, the course examines the theoretical elaborations and movements of structuralism and pragmatism through the 1960s. The instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 25.

Anthropology GR6157y IDEA OF A BLACK RADICAL TRADITION. 3 pts.  Instructor: David Scott.  This course will seek to raise and think through the following questions: What does it mean to talk today about a black radical tradition? What has it meant in the past to speak in these (or cognate) terms? And if we take the debate in part at least to inhabit a normative discursive space, an argumentative space in which to make claims on the moral-political present, what ought it to mean to talk about a black radical tradition?  Enrollment is limited to 16.

Anthropology GR6212y PRIN/APPL-SOC & CULTRL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3 pts.  Instructor: Ellen Marakowitz.  Prerequisites: ANTH G4201 Principles and Applications of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the instructor’s permission. Focus on research and writing for the Masters level thesis, including research design, bibliography and background literature development, and writing. Prerequisites: ANTH G4201 Principles and Applications of Social and Cultural Anthropology.  Enrollment is limited to 18.

Anthropology GR6227y ETHNOGRAPHIES AT THE END OF THE WORLD. 3 pts. Instructor: Juan Carlos Mazariegos.  What can we learn from anthropological and ethnographic research in and about a damaged world, a world confronted by the violence and effects of war, climate change, transnational migration, post-industrial abandonment, and the lives and afterlives of colonialism and slavery? What are the ethnographic debates that address the catastrophes produced by capitalism and the lifeforms that emerge out of its ruins? What types of anthropological critique emerge in times enunciated as ‘the end of the world’? And what comes after this end? Ethnographies at the End of the World addresses these questions by paying close attention to some of the most relevant debates in contemporary anthropological theory and anthropological critique. These debates include, among others, discussions on violence and trauma, the politics of life and death, the work of memory and oblivion, and the material entanglements between human and non-human forms of existence. The aim of this seminar is to generate a discussion around the multiple implications of these theoretical arrangements and how anthropologists deploy them in their ethnographic understandings of the world we live in. In doing so, this course provides students with a fundamental understanding and conceptual knowledge about how anthropologists use and produce theory, and how this theoretical production is mobilized as a social critique. This course is reading intensive and operates in the form of a seminar. It is intended, primarily, for MA students in the department of anthropology and graduate students in other departments. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR6305y ART, AESTHETICS & THE POLITICAL. 3 pts. Instructor: Marilyn Ivy. Cross-disciplinary in inspiration, this seminar engages work in anthropology, art criticism, literary studies, aesthetics, and philosophy to think about the political possibilities of art and the aesthetic dimensions of the political. Focusing most sharply (but not exclusively) on what is variously called socially engaged art, relational art, or participatory art, the seminar will consider recent art practices, performances, texts, and objects across a diverse range of genres and national-cultural locations. Art thinkers studied will include Kant, Benjamin, Adorno, Lyotard, Ranciere, Kitagawa, García-Canclini, Groys, Bishop, Bourriard, and beyond. Instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology GR6345y POETICS & POLIT-INFRASTRUCTURE. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Larkin.  Infrastructures are the material forms that allow for the possibility of exchange over space, invisible conduits that comprise the technical architecture that allow urban spaces to form and creates grounds for the circulation that ties those spaces to larger grids. But bodies of recent scholarship have come to interrogate the ways in which infrastructures comprise the conditions of existence for social experience, political action and economic order. This class seeks to examine what an analysis of infrastructure might add to anthropological analysis. Drawing from anthropology, science studies, media theory and history we will analyze the technical conditions of infrastructures, the legal regulations they give rise to, the political action they generate and the forms of everyday life they enable. Students need to attend the first class to finalize enrollment. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 13.

Anthropology GR9999y WEDNESDAY SEMINAR. 0 pts. Instructor: Catherine Fennell.  All anthropology graduate students are required to attend. Reports of ongoing research are presented by staff members, students, and special guests. Notes: Only Anthropology PhDs in residence are required to register. Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4481y SCI & ART IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION. 4 pts. Instructor: Zoe Crossland and Co-instructor: Tracy Molis. Archaeology has provided a rich imaginative resource for many artists, who have found inspiration in the discipline’s material engagement with the past, its evocation of absent presences, and its strange juxtaposition of practical activity and textual narrative. In this course we continue the exploration of art’s intersections with archaeology, but we take an alternate starting point. Scientific illustration has been a key part of archaeological work since the discipline’s origins in the antiquarian investigations of the 16th and 17th centuries. These antiquarian records drew upon techniques that were elaborated during the Renaissance and many of these illustrative forms remain relevant today. Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology GR6051y VALUE, OBJECTS, AND MEANING.  3 pts.  Instructor: Hannah Chazin.  This course explores how anthropologists have engaged with the question of value as means of understanding and comparing human social engagement with the creation, circulation, and consumption of objects and ideas. In doing so, this course will read classical anthropological texts concerned with exchange, social meaning and action and consider a variety of topics of anthropological interest such as gifts, commodities, capitalism, inequality, and the relationships between humans and nonhumans of many kinds. The course traces how questions and arguments that emerged out of earlier debates in “economic” anthropology were taken up and altered in later conversations about the analytical importance and utility of material and semiotic approaches. In doing so, the course explores what these genealogies might say about the possibility of, and the potential usefulness or desirability of, a contemporary or future-looking anthropology of value.  Enrollment is limited to 18.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GR6192y EXHIBITION PRAC-GLOBAL CONTEXT. 3 pts. Instructor: David Harvey. This course addresses the practical challenges entailed in the process of creating a successful exhibition. Developing an actual curatorial project, students will get an opportunity to apply the museum anthropology theory they are exposed to throughout the program. They will be given a hands-on approach to the different stages involved in the curation of a show, from the in-depth researching of a topic to the writing, editing and design of an exhibition that will be effective for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ANTH G6352 Museum Anthropology: history and theory / ANTH G6353 Politics and Practice of Museum Exhibitions; G9110, G9111 and the instructor’s permission. Corequisites: ANTH G6353. Museum Anthropology M.A. students have priority. Others must have the permission of the instructor No undergraduates allowed to register. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR6365y EXHIBITION CULTURES.  3 pts. Instructor: Laurel Kendall. This course is a continuation of Museum Anthropology G6352 (not a prerequisite). Through the study of museum exhibitions, this course explores a series of debates about the representation of culture in museums, the politics of identity, and the significance of objects. We will consider the museum as a contemporary and variable form, as a site for the expression of national, group, and individual identity and as a site of performance and consumption. We will consider how exhibits are developed, what they aim to convey, what makes them effective (or not), and how they sometimes become flashpoints of controversy. Because the work of museums is visual, enacted through the display of material forms, we will also consider the transformation of objects into artifacts and as part of exhibitions, addressing questions of meaning, ownership, value, and magic. We will look at this range of issues from the point of view of practitioners, critics, and audiences. In collaboration with G6352, students develop a small AMNH exhibit; this year we will focus on a Tibetan Thangka painting (AMNH #70.3/8090) to explore contemporary Thangkas and those who paint them. Museum Anthropology M.A. students have priority to enroll. Others must have Instructor permission. No undergraduates permitted to enroll. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR9110y MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP I. 3 pts.  Instructor: Brian Boyd. An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs. /week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs. /week (for 6). Involves meaningful work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

Anthropology GR9111y MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP II. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Boyd. An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs. /week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs. /week (for 6). Involves meaningful work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGICAL/PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GR4148y HUMAN SKELETAL BIOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Ralph Holloway. Recommended for archaeology and physical anthropology students, pre-meds, and biology majors interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of bones. Other primate skeletal materials and fossil casts used for comparative study.  Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 8.

For a list of Graduate Independent Research Courses, Please refer to the Directory of Classes at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

SUMMER 2022 COURSE LISTINGS

Please refer to https://summer.sps.columbia.edu/courses/summer-courses for more information

(First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022

Anthropology S1002 (section 001) THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE.  3 pts.  Instructor:  Neil J. Savishinsky. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.  Enrollment limit is 25.

Anthropology UN3751 PERSONHOOD.  4 pts.  Instructor:  María José de Abreu.  This seminar seeks to engage with materials that question personhood. Drawing on both fictional and non-fictional accounts, we will be involved with textual and visual documents as well institutional contexts in order to revisit such notion under contemporary capitalism. We will cover topics like rites of passage and life cycle, the role of the nation state and local communities in defining a person, the relation between self and non-self, between the living and the dead. We will likewise address vicarious forms of personhood through the prosthetic, the avatar or the heteronomous. But we will also look into forms of dissipation and/or enhancement of personhood through bodybuilding, guinea-piging and pharmo-toxicities. As a whole, the course will bring to light how the question of personhood cross-culturally relates to language, performativity, religion, technology, law, gender, race, class, care, life and death. Enrollment limit is 20.

Anthropology S3921 ANTI-COLONIALISM.  4 pts.  Instructor:  David Scott.  The age of colonialism, so it seems, is long over. Decolonization has resulted in the emergence of postcolonial polities and societies that are now, in many instances, two generations old. But is it clear that the problem of colonialism has disappeared? Almost everywhere in the postcolonial world the project of building independent polities, economies and societies have faltered, sometimes run aground. Indeed, one might say that the anti-colonial dream of emancipation has evaporated. Through a careful exploration of the conceptual argument and rhetorical style of five central anti-colonial texts—C.L.R. James’ The Black Jacobins, Mahatma Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, Aimé Cesairé’s Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi’s Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth—this course aims to inquire into the image of colonialism as a structure of dominant power, and the image of its anticipated aftermaths: What were the perceived ill-effects of colonial power? What did colonialism do to the colonized that required rectification? In what ways did the critique of colonial power (the identification of what was wrong with it) shape the longing for its anti-colonial overcoming?  Enrollment limit is 20.

Please refer to https://summer.sps.columbia.edu/courses/summer-courses for more information

(Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022

Anthropology S1002 (section 002) THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE.  3 pts.  Instructor:  Maxine Weisgrau. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.  Enrollment limit is 25.

Anthropology S3009 THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF ISLAM.  3 pts.  Instructor: Maria F Malmstrom.  This course centers on the constantly changing ambivalent everyday lived realities, experiences, interpretations as well as the multiple meanings of Islam and focuses less on the study of Islam as a discursive tradition. Furthermore, the course challenges stereotypes of Islam, and of people who one way or another can be called Muslims; most often perceived as a homogenous category through which all Muslim societies are imagined. The course is divided into six parts. The first part introduces the idea of “anthropology of Islam” through different readings in anthropology and various, experiences, practices, dimensions of Islam as a relationship between humans and God. In the second part, the focus is to listen to Islam and connect the different sonic bodies of Islam to power and politics. The third part interrogates preconceived ideas about Islam, gender, feminism, and agency. The fourth part studies Islam, body, sexuality and eroticism. The fifth part is concerned with Islam, youth culture, identity, belonging and rebellion. The last part critically analyzes Islam, modernity, orientalism, post-colonialism and not least today’s fear and notion of imagined enemies.  Enrollment limit is 20.

FALL 2022 COURSE LISTINGS

Refer to the online Directory of Classes http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/ for days and times that courses will be offered.

Projected Registration Dates for Fall 2022:  Monday, April 18, 2022, for more information visit: https://www.registrar.columbia.edu/content/registration-dates-2022-2023

 

COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

 

Anthropology UN1002x THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Naor Ben-Yehoyada.  The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.  Recitation section required.  Days and times will be announced a few weeks before the start of term. Please refer to the Directory of Classes for detailed information http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

 

Anthropology UN1003x THE ENVIRONMENT.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Sonia Ahsan.  This course introduces students to the fundamental idea of an “environment” and its concomitant concepts of crisis, climate, history, planet, and humanity. The course considers these concepts from within the humanities, while also offering a global and anthropological perspective. Through lectures, discussions, and assignments students will become familiar with major academic debates in environmental humanities and environmental studies. Students from all areas of study are welcome and no prior knowledge of the material is necessary.  Recitation section required.  Days and times will be announced a few weeks before the start of term. Please refer to the Directory of Classes for detailed information http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

 

Anthropology UN2004x INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND CULTURAL THEORY.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  John Pemberton.  This course presents students with crucial theories of society, paying particular attention at the outset to classic social theory of the early 20th century. It traces a trajectory of writings essential for an understanding of the social: from Saussure, Durkheim, Mauss, Weber, and Marx, on to the structuralist ethnographic elaboration of Claude Levi-Strauss and the historiographic reflections on modernity of Michel Foucault. We revisit periodically, writings from Franz Boas, founder of anthropology in the United States (and of Anthropology at Columbia), for a sense of origins, an early anthropological critique of racism and cultural chauvinism, and a prescient denunciation of fascism.  We turn as well, also with ever-renewed interest in these times, to the expansive critical thought of W. E. B. Du Bois.  We conclude with Kathleen Stewart’s A Space on the Side of the Road--an ethnography of late-twentieth-century Appalachia and the haunted remains of coal-mining country--with its depictions of an uncanny otherness within dominant American narratives.

 

Anthropology UN3040x ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY.  4 pts.  Instructor:  Lesley Sharp.  Comprehensive and in-depth engagement with foundational and contemporary theoretical concepts and texts in Anthropology. Required of all Barnard students majoring in Anthropology (including specialized tracks). Permission of instructor required for non-majors. Not open to First Year students. Prerequisite:  an introductory (1000 level) course in Anthropology. The enrollment limit is 30.

 

Anthropology UN3702x BLACK/LIFE/SCIENCE.  4 Pts.  Instructor: Vanessa Agard-Jones.  What is the relationship of the production of scientific knowledge to Black life in the Americas? What can thinking that arises out of the intellectual traditions of Black Studies contribute to our understandings of the many genres of science (social, physical, earth, life) and their relationship to justice? Building from these essential questions, this course offers a framework for considering the ways that canonical sciences have constrained, categorized, and delimited Black lives, exploring such themes as: technoscientific constructions of race difference, epigenetic theories about the heritability of trauma, histories of biomedical experimentation, the long durée of eugenicist thinking, and the relationship of racialized (and gendered) bodies to their environments. We will also explore scientific scripts emergent from “below,” like: folk healing, speculative fictions, and Black nationalist origin stories, that have and continue to be sources of imaginative and emancipatory promise. In addition to developing the capacity to read widely across genres of science and critical studies thereof, students will develop skills in the deconstruction and speculative refiguring of scientific discourse. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor's Permission REQUIRED (email [email protected]). Priority: Students with coursework experience in Anthropology or African American and African Diaspora Studies.

 

Anthropology UN3729x BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE: ANTHROPOLOGY OF REVOLUTION.  4 Pts. Instructor: Anna Reumert.  In this course, we are going to examine political imagination in revolutionary times and discuss issues of representation and authorship that emerge when people mobilize for change. Taking lessons from anthropology, critical theory, queer and feminist theory, as well as postcolonial and Black studies, we will apply a method of critical inquiry to readings of the revolution as historical concept and as a lived experience. We will examine not simply “what happened”, but how we came to know about it: What determines whether a popular uprising is written into history as a “revolution” or dismissed as a “riot”? What does it mean for a revolution to “succeed”? Who gets to author the revolution as such –– the people on the street, the people who take power, or the people writing about the event after it happened? Who gets to be the protagonists of the revolution, and who are left out? How does class, race and gender figure into this hierarchy of voice?  We will apply these questions in reading two contemporary uprisings that get to the heart of the tensions between “identarian” and “universal” political claims: The Movement for Black Lives in the US, and Lebanon’s civil uprising of 2019-20. Both uprisings mobilized against racial capitalism and sectarianism and were met with state and police violence. We will examine the political critique that emerged from these uprisings, and how they might enable a critique of the political as an exclusionary concept. By reading activist, scholarly and artist interpretations of the uprisings, including film, dance, poetry, and manifestos, we will ask: What new forms of political mobilization and visions emerge from this critique?  The Enrollment limit is 18. 

 

Anthropology UN3846x MEXICO'S DISAPPEARED PRACTICUM.  4 pts.  Instructor:  Claudio Lomnitz.  This seminar examines the causes and social dynamics of the phenomenon of forced disappearance in contemporary Mexico.  It is an engaged pedagogy course, meaning that the academic work we do will be conducted in conjunction with, and for the benefit of, collectives of families of the disappeared.  Specifically, our course is organized around collaborative research with two collectives, one in the Cuernavaca, Morelos ("Volviendo a Casa, Morelos") and one in the city of Puebla ("Voz de los desaparecidos"). We shall also be collaborating with the Universidad Iberoamericana-Puebla's Human Rights Program, and the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa's Proyecto sobre desaparición forzada, that have been accompanying the collectives of the families of the disappeared.  In addition to background academic coursework on the subject, students will conduct social and legal conditions research that will assist the Morelos and Puebla collectives in their daily efforts to process their legal claims to gain government support in their efforts to find their loved ones, as well as in their independent efforts to make their plight socially visible, and to find their disappeared loved ones.  Enrollment Restrictions and Priorities:  SPANISH LANGUAGE PREFERRED; MAJORS AND CONCENTRATORS PREFERRED. Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

Anthropology BC3234x INDIGENOUS PLACE-THOUGHT.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Severin Fowles. This seminar considers what it means to be of a place and to think with and be committed to that place—environmentally, politically, and spiritually. After locating ourselves in our own particular places and place-based commitments, our attention turns to the Indigenous traditions of North America, to accounts of tribal emergence and pre-colonial being, to colonial histories of land dispossession, to ongoing struggles to protect ecological health and land-based sovereignty, to the epistemological and moral systems that have developed over the course of many millennia of living with and for the land, and to the contributions such systems might make to our collective future. The seminar’s title is borrowed from an essay on “Indigenous place-thought” by Mohawk/Anishinaabe scholar Vanessa Watts.  PREF: To STUD PAR in Native AMER/INDID Studies(NAIS)MIN/CONC. The enrollment limit is 15.  The permission of the instructor is required.

 

CSER UN3303x WHITENESS, SENTIMENT AND POLITICAL.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Catherine Fennell.  Scholars of gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race have long been preoccupied with the terms, categories, and processes through which the United States has excluded or qualified the citizenship of particular groups, including women, immigrants, indigenous nations, and descendants of enslaved Africans. Yet it has spent less time interrogating the unqualified content of Americanness, and the work that the imagination of a "default" American identity does in contemporary political life. This seminar introduces students to this problem through an unspoken racial dimension of American political belonging -- the presumed whiteness of ideal American citizens. Readings drawn from several disciplinary traditions, including anthropology, linguistics, sociology, history, and journalism, will ground students in the course's key concepts, including racial markedness, the history of racialization, and public sentiment. Students will mobilize these tools to analyze several cases that rendered white sentiment explicit in politically efficacious ways, including the "panic" incited by the destabilization of race-based residential segregation, the "paranoia" of conspiracy theorists, the "sympathy" associated with natural disasters, and the "resentment" or "rage" associated with the loss of racial privileges.  Enrollment is limited to 22.  Priority to CSER and Anthropology students. The permission of the instructor is required.

 

Anthropology BC3871x SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR I: 4 points.  Instructors: Paige West, Lesley Sharp, and Camilla Sturm.  Prerequisites: Limited to Barnard Anthropology Seniors. Offered every Fall. Discussion of research methods and planning and writing of a Senior Essay in Anthropology will accompany research on problems of interest to students, culminating in the writing of individual Senior Essays. The advisory system requires periodic consultation and discussion between the student and her adviser as well as the meeting of specific deadlines set by the department each semester. Limited to Barnard Anthropology Seniors Only.

 

Anthropology UN3879x THE MEDICAL IMAGINARY.  4 Pts.  Instructor: Lesley Sharp.  How might we speak of an imaginary within biomedicine? This course interrogates the ideological underpinnings of technocratic medicine in contexts that extend from the art of surgery to patient participation in experimental drug trials. Issues of scale will prove especially important in our efforts to track the medical imaginary from the whole, fleshy body to the molecular level. Key themes include everyday ethics; ways of seeing and knowing; suffering and hope; and subjectivity in a range of medical and sociomedical contexts. Enrollment is limited to 15; Non-Anthropology majors require the permission of the instructor prior to registration; no first year students.

 

Anthropology UN3888x ECOCRITICISM FOR THE END TIMES.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Marilyn Ivy. This seminar aims to show what an anthropologically informed, ecocritical cultural studies can offer in this moment of intensifying ecological calamity. The course will not only engage significant works in anthropology, ecocriticism, philosophy, literature, politics, and aesthetics to think about the environment, it will also bring these works into engaged reflection on living in the end times (borrowing cultural critic Slavoj Zizeks phrase). The seminar will thus locate critical perspectives on the environment within the contemporary worldwide ecological crisis, emphasizing the ethnographic realities of global warming, debates on nuclear power and energy, and the place of nature. Drawing on the professor’s long experience in Japan and current research on the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster, the seminar will also take care to unpack the notion of end times, with its apocalyptic implications, through close considerations of works that take on the question of ecocatastrophe in our times. North American and European perspectives, as well as international ones (particularly ones drawn from East Asia), will give the course a global reach. Enrollment is limited to 12.  MUST email the instructor for permission at [email protected].

 

Anthropology UN3937x MASS-MEDIATED CULTURES.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Rosalind Morris.   How do new media technologies affect social worlds? What is the relationship between mass mediation and modernity? Explores the force of media technology and its relationship to transnational forms of capital, to the development of new subjectivities, and to the rise of new networks of power and social relations. Prerequisites: at least one course in anthropology or social theory. The permission of the instructor is required.   Enrollment is limited to 22. 

 

Anthropology BC3911x THE SOCIAL CONTEXTS OF U.S. IMMIGRATION LAW AND POLICY.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  J.C. Salyer.  Examines the historical and contemporary social, economic, and political factors that shape immigration law and policy along with the social consequences of those laws and policies. Addresses the development and function of immigration law and aspects of the immigration debate including unauthorized immigration, anti-immigration sentiments, and critiques of immigration policy. The permission of the instructor is required.    Enrollment is limited to 25.  Notes: Priority: Jr/Sr. & students w/related majors or thesis topics.

 

Anthropology BC3932x CLIMATE CHANGE, GLOBAL MIGRATION, AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE ANTHROPOCENE. 4 Pts.  Instructor:  J.C. Salyer. Examines the historical and contemporary social, economic, and political factors that shape immigration law and policy along with the social consequences of those laws and policies. Addresses the development and function of immigration law and aspects of the immigration debate including unauthorized immigration, anti-immigration sentiments, and critiques of immigration policy. Enrollment is limited to 25.  The permission of the instructor is required. Notes: Priority: Jr/Sr. & students w/related majors or thesis topics.

 

CSER UN3942x RACE AND RACISMS.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Catherine Fennell.  In this class we will approach race and racism from a variety of disciplinary and intellectual perspectives, including: critical race theory/philosophy, anthropology, history and history of science and medicine. We will focus on the development and deployment of the race concept since the mid-19th century. Students will come to understand the many ways in which race has been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, managed and observed in the (social) sciences, medicine, and public health. We will also explore the practices and effects of race (and race-making) in familiar and less familiar social and political worlds. In addition to the courses intellectual content, students will gain critical practice in the seminar format -- that is, a collegial, discussion-driven exchange of ideas. Enrollment limit is 22.  Priority to CSER Students and the permission of the instructor is required.

 

Anthropology UN3997x SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH.  2-6 Pts.  STAFF.  Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.  The permission of the instructor is required.

 

Anthropology UN3999x SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Lila Abu-Lughod.  Students must have declared a major in Anthropology prior to registration. Students must have a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to be considered. Interested students must communicate/meet with thesis instructor in the previous spring about the possibility of taking the course during the upcoming academic year. Additionally, expect to discuss with the instructor at the end of the fall term whether your project has progressed far enough to be completed in the spring term. If it has not, you will exit the seminar after one semester, with a grade based on the work completed during the fall term. This two-term course is a combination of a seminar and a workshop that will help you conduct research, write, and present an original senior thesis in anthropology. Students who write theses are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The first term of this course introduces a variety of approaches used to produce anthropological knowledge and writing; encourages students to think critically about the approaches they take to researching and writing by studying model texts with an eye to the ethics, constraints, and potentials of anthropological research and writing; and gives students practice in the seminar and workshop formats that are key to collegial exchange and refinement of ideas. During the first term, students complete a few short exercises that will culminate in a substantial draft of one discrete section of their senior project (18-20 pages) plus a detailed outline of the expected work that remains to be done (5 pages). The spring sequence of the anthropology thesis seminar is a writing intensive continuation of the fall semester, in which students will have designed the research questions, prepared a full thesis proposal that will serve as a guide for the completion of the thesis and written a draft of one chapter. Only those students who expect to have completed the fall semester portion of the course are allowed to register for the spring; final enrollment is contingent upon successful completion of first semester requirements. In spring semester, weekly meetings will be devoted to the collaborative refinement of drafts, as well as working through issues of writing (evidence, voice, authority etc.). All enrolled students are required to present their project at a symposium in the late spring, and the final grade is based primarily on successful completion of the thesis/ capstone project.  Note:  Columbia College & General Studies Majors by instructor’s permission only. 

 

Anthropology GU4145x ZORA.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Vanessa Agard-Jones.   Zora Neale Hurston—Barnard College ‘28 and a once-graduate student in Columbia’s department of Anthropology—was a pioneering chronicler of Black folklore, a student of Black expression, and a creative imaginer of Black worlds via her novels, short stories, plays and poetry. From her travels throughout the U.S. South, to Haiti, Jamaica, and beyond, Hurston took as her mission a diasporic articulation of Black life in the Americas. In this seminar, we ask what a deep reading of Hurston’s oeuvre can teach us about the history of Anthropology, about the blurry borders between fiction and ethnography, and about the legacies that her work leaves—in communities of scholarly practice and beyond. Priority: Students with coursework experience in Anthropology, African American and African Diaspora Studies, and/or Gender/Sexuality Studies. Advanced undergraduates will be considered.  Enrollment is limited to 14.  Instructor's Permission REQUIRED (email [email protected]).

 

Anthropology GU4172x WRITTEN CULTURE.  3 Pts. Instructor:  Brinkley Messick.    At the turn of the twentieth century, writing was considered the evolutionary "hallmark" of civilization. Its presence or absence in societies also served to demarcate the boundaries of disciplinary inquiry, with anthropologists then specialized in peoples "without" writing. In recent decades, however, as critical reflection began to focus on writings by anthropologists, attention also turned to what James Clifford referred to as "the scratching of other pens." Studies of our own and other textualities now are part of advancing conversations between Anthropology, History and Literary Studies. Among other topics, we will study the earlier print revolution for ideas that might help us understand "texting" and other aspects of writing in the current digital revolution. The enrollment limit is 15.

 

COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

 

Anthropology UN1007x THE ORIGINS OF HUMAN SOCIETY.  3 Pts. Instructor:  Camilla Strum.  An archaeological perspective on the evolution of human social life from the first bipedal step of our ape ancestors to the establishment of large sedentary villages. While traversing six million years and six continents, our explorations will lead us to consider such major issues as the development of human sexuality, the origin of language, the birth of “art” and religion, the domestication of plants and animals, and the foundations of social inequality. Designed for anyone who happens to be human.  Recitation section required.  Please refer to the Directory of Classes.  Enrollment is limited to 140.  Recitation section required.  Day/time will be announced a few weeks before the start of term. Please refer to the Directory of Classes http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

 

Anthropology UN3663x THE ANCIENT TABLE: ARCHAEOLOGY OF COOKING.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Camilla Sturm. Prerequisites: None Humans don’t just eat to live. The ways we prepare, eat, and share our food is a complex reflection of our histories, environments, and ideologies. Whether we prefer coffee or tea, cornbread or challah, chicken breast or chicken feet, our tastes are expressive of social ties and social boundaries, and are linked to ideas of family and of foreignness. How did eating become such a profoundly cultural experience? This seminar takes an archaeological approach to two broad issues central to eating: First, what drives human food choices both today and in the past? Second, how have social forces shaped practices of food acquisition, preparation, and consumption (and how, in turn, has food shaped society)? We will explore these questions from various evolutionary, physiological, and cultural viewpoints, highlighted by information from the best archaeological and historic case studies. Topics that will be covered include the nature of the first cooking, beer-brewing and feasting, writing of the early recipes, gender roles and ‘domestic’ life, and how a national cuisine takes shape. Through the course of the semester we will explore food practices from Pleistocene Spain to historic Monticello, with particular emphasis on the earliest cuisines of China, Mesoamerica, and the Mediterranean. Enrollment is limited to 16.  The permission of the instructor is required.  Notes: Non-Anthro Majors need instructs Permission. No First-years.

 

Anthropology UN3823x ARCHAEOLOGY ENGAGED: THE PAST IN THE PUBLIC EYE.  4 Pts. Instructor.  Terence D’Altroy. This course provides a panoramic, but intensive, inquiry into the ways that archaeology and its methods for understanding the world have been marshaled for debate in issues of public interest. It is designed to examine claims to knowledge of the past through the lenses of alternative epistemologies and a series of case-based problems that range from the academic to the political, legal, cultural, romantic, and fraudulent. Enrollment Priorities: Seniors and Juniors in ARCH or ANTH.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

Anthropology/History GU4001x THE ANCIENT EMPIRES 3 Pts.  Instructor:  T. D'Altroy. This course provides a comparative study of five of the world's most prominent ancient empires: Rome, Egypt, Qin/Han China, the Aztecs, and the Inkas. The developmental histories of those polities, and their essential sociopolitical, economic, and ideological features, are examined in light of theories of the nature of early empires and methods of studying them. Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement. Undergraduate recitation required. Enrollment is limited to 100.

 

Anthropology GU4345x NEANDERTHAL ALTERITIES.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Brian Boyd.  Using The Neanderthals partly as a metaphorical device, this course considers the anthropological, philosophical and ethical implications of sharing the world with another human species. Beginning from a solid grounding in the archaeological, biological and genetic evidence, we will reflect critically on why Neanderthals are rarely afforded the same reflexive capacities, qualities and attributes - agency- as anatomically modern humans, and why they are often regarded as lesser or nonhuman animals despite clear evidence for both sophisticated material and social engagement with the world and its resources. Readings/materials are drawn from anthropology, philosophy, ethics, gender studies, race and genetics studies, literature and film. Course open to graduate & advanced undergraduate (3rd & 4th Years) students only.  Enrollment is limited to 25 and the instructor’s approval is required.  

 

COURSE IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

 

Anthropology UN3970x BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF HUMAN VARIATION. 4 Pts. Instructor:  Ralph Holloway.  Biological evidence for the modern human diversity at the molecular, phenotypical, and behavioral levels, as distributed geographically.  Enrollment is limited to 10. Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 and the instructor's permission.

 

CROSS-LISTED COURSES:

 

History UN2978x SCIENCE AND PSEUDOSCIENCE: ALCHEMY TO AI. 4 Pts.  Instructor:  Pamela Smith.  During the 2020 US presidential election and the years of the COVID-19 pandemic, science and “scientific truths” were fiercely contested. This course provides a historical perspective on the issues at stake. The course begins with an historical account of how areas of natural knowledge, such as astrology, alchemy, and “natural magic,” which were central components of an educated person’s view of the world in early modern Europe, became marginalized, while a new philosophy of nature (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality. Historical developments examined in this course out of which this new understanding of nature emerged include the rise of the centralized state, religious reform, and European expansion. The course uses this historical account to show how science and pseudoscience developed in tandem in the period from 1400 to 1800. This historical account equips students to examine contemporary issues of expertise, the social construction of science, pluralism in science, certainty and uncertainty in science, as well as critical engagement with contemporary technologies.  The enrollment limit is 90. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/#/cu/bulletin/uwb/subj/HIST/W2978-20223-001/ The required discussion section is HIST UN2979:  http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/#/cu/bulletin/uwb/subj/HIST/W2979-20223-001/

Refer to the online Directory of Classes http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/ for days and times that courses will be offered.

Projected Registration Dates for Fall 2022:  Monday, April 18, 2022, for more information visit: https://www.registrar.columbia.edu/content/registration-dates-2022-2023

 

COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

 

Anthropology GU4145x ZORA.  4 Pts.  Instructor:  Vanessa Agard-Jones.   Zora Neale Hurston—Barnard College ‘28 and a once-graduate student in Columbia’s department of Anthropology—was a pioneering chronicler of Black folklore, a student of Black expression, and a creative imaginer of Black worlds via her novels, short stories, plays and poetry. From her travels throughout the U.S. South, to Haiti, Jamaica, and beyond, Hurston took as her mission a diasporic articulation of Black life in the Americas. In this seminar, we ask what a deep reading of Hurston’s oeuvre can teach us about the history of Anthropology, about the blurry borders between fiction and ethnography, and about the legacies that her work leaves—in communities of scholarly practice and beyond. Enrollment Limit: 14.  Instructor's Permission REQUIRED (email [email protected]).  Priority: Students with coursework experience in Anthropology, African American and African Diaspora Studies, and/or Gender/Sexuality Studies. Advanced undergraduates will be considered.

 

Anthropology GU4172x WRITTEN CULTURE.  3 Pts. Instructor:  Brinkley Messick.    At the turn of the twentieth century, writing was considered the evolutionary "hallmark" of civilization. Its presence or absence in societies also served to demarcate the boundaries of disciplinary inquiry, with anthropologists then specialized in peoples "without" writing. In recent decades, however, as critical reflection began to focus on writings by anthropologists, attention also turned to what James Clifford referred to as "the scratching of other pens." Studies of our own and other textualities now are part of advancing conversations between Anthropology, History and Literary Studies. Among other topics, we will study the earlier print revolution for ideas that might help us understand "texting" and other aspects of writing in the current digital revolution. The enrollment limit is 15.

 

Anthropology GR5201x PRIN/APPL OF SOCIETY & CULTURE.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Ellen Marakowitz.  Prerequisites: graduate standing. Introductory survey of major concepts and areas of research in social and cultural anthropology. Emphasis is on both the field, as it is currently constituted and its relationship to other scholarly and professional disciplines. Required for students in Anthropology Department's master degree program and for students in the graduate programs of other departments and professional schools desiring an introduction in this field.  Open to MAs IN ANTH. OTHERS MUST E-MAIL [email protected].

 

Anthropology GR5480x CRITICAL NATIVE AND INDIGENOUS STUDIES.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Audra Simpson.   This course is an interdisciplinary survey of the literature and issues that comprise Native American and Indigenous Studies. Readings for this course are organized around the concepts of indigeneity, coloniality, power and resistance and concomitantly interrogate these concepts for social and cultural analysis. The syllabus is derived from some of the classic and canonical works in Native American Studies such as Custer Died for Your Sins but will also require an engagement with less canonical works such as Red Mans Appeal to Justice in addition to historical, ethnographic and theoretical contributions from scholars that work outside of Native American and Indigenous Studies. This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.  Enrollment limit is 20.

 

Anthropology GR6038x PLACE, SPACE, NATURE. 3 Pts. Instructor:  Paige West.  This class examines the social production of space, place, and nature. Three discursive and material fields that must be understood if we are to practice a conceptually rigorous and politically engaged contemporary anthropology. In the course, we will examine how these fields have recently been studied, described, conceptualized, and theorized. We will explore these ideas through the reading of works by anthropologists, historians, and geographers, looking at how the changing nature of places affects both the discipline of anthropology and the ways in which anthropologists conduct research in places. Enrollment is limited to 15. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

 

Anthropology GR6070x MAKING ETHNOG: METHOD & WRITING.  3 Pts. Instructor:  Juan Carlos Mazariegos.  This course begins with two central and related epistemological problems in conducting ethnographic research: first, the notion that objects of scientific research are ‘made’ through adopting a particular relational stance and asking certain kinds of questions. From framing a research problem and choosing a ‘research context’ story to tell, to the kinds of methods one selects to probe such a problem, the ‘how’ and ‘what’ – or means and content – are inextricably intertwined. A second epistemological problem concerns the artifice of reality, and the nebulous distinction between truth and fiction, no less than the question of where or with whom one locates such truth. With these issues framing the course, we will work through some key themes and debates in anthropology from the perspective of methodology, ranging from subject/object liminality to incommensurability and radical alterity to the politics of representation. Students will design an ethnographic project of their choosing and conduct research throughout the term, applying different methodological approaches popular in anthropology and the social sciences more generally, such as participant observation, semi-structured interview, diary-keeping and note-taking.  Intended for MAs in ANTH & Grad students in other Depts.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

 

Anthropology GR6164x NEW SOVEREIGNTIES, NEW STATES.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Professor Claudio Lomnitz.   This graduate seminar explores the structural transformations that neoliberal reforms has sparked in weak states, focusing particularly on the tense relationship between sovereignty and governance.  Due to the relatively recent emergence of neoliberalism as a form of governance, anthropologies of the state and neoliberalism have tended to focus on the dialectic between neoliberal reform-- together with its normative principles-- and resistances to it.  Given the decline of neoliberalism, however, this mode of analysis is now patently insufficient, and it needs to give way to the study of a post-neoliberal order.  In this seminar we shall analyze the nature of this order empirically, particularly in weak states.  Specifically, the seminar explores the mechanisms by which states have sought to secure or even fortify sovereignty, while neglecting or even relinquishing core attributes that had characterized modern states in the 20th century, such as policing, or the administration of justice.  While the consensus around the desirability of neoliberal reform is now past, and some of its organizing principles are in jeopardy, the form of governance that is emerging in many weak states-- a form of governance that we characterize broadly as "sovereignty without justice"-- has neoliberal reforms as its condition of possibility, and often as a key ideological referent.   By way of an engagement with recent thick descriptions of cases of contemporary state transformation, we seek to conceptualize, characterize and move toward a typology of weak states in the contemporary global ecumene. Enrollment is limited to 15.  The permission of the instructor is required.

 

Anthropology GR6245x PERSONHOOD.  3 Pts.  Instructor: María José de Abreu.  This seminar seeks to engage with materials that question personhood. Drawing on both fictional and non-fictional accounts, we will be involved with textual and visual documents as well institutional contexts in order to revisit such notion under contemporary capitalism. We will cover topics like rites of passage and life cycle, the role of the nation state and local communities in defining a person, the relation between self and non-self, between the living and the dead. We will likewise address vicarious forms of personhood through the prosthetic, the avatar or the anonymous. But we will also look into forms of dissipation of personhood and unreliable agency where subjects become more like a medium through which to think rhythms and ongoing infrastructures of the living. As a whole, the course will bring to light how the question of personhood cross-culturally relates to language, performativity, religion, law, gender, race, class, care, life and death.  The permission of the instructor is required.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

Anthropology/Middle East GR6406x THE MODERN STATE AND THE COLONIAL SUBJECT.  3 Pts. Instructor:  Mahmood Mamdani. On the development of legal thought on the colonial subject. Focus on the American Indian in the New World, and subjugated peoples in the Ottoman Empire, in British India and in tropical and southern Africa. Enrollment is limited to 15. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

 

Anthropology GR6601x QUESTIONS-ANTHROP THRY I: TEXTS.  3 Pts.  Instructor:   David Scott.  Presents students with critical theories of society, paying particular attention to classic continental social theory of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will trace a trajectory through important French and German writings essential for any understanding of the modern discipline of anthropology: from Saussure through Durkheim and Mauss, Marx, Weber, and on to the structuralist elaboration of these theoretical perspectives in Claude Lévi-Strauss, always bearing in mind the relationship of these theories to contemporary anthropology. We come last to Foucault and affiliated theorists as successors both to French structuralism and to German social theory and its concerns with modernity, rationality, and power. Throughout the readings, we will give special care to questions of signification as they inform anthropological inquiry, and we will be alert to the historical contexts that situate the discipline of anthropology today.  Only open to 1st-year PhD Anthropology students. Others not allowed.

 

Anthropology GR6649x DARK ECOLOGIES: ECOCRITICAL THOUGHT NOW.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Marilyn Ivy.  This seminar aims to disclose what an anthropologically informed, ecocritical cultural studies can offer in this moment of intensifying ecological calamity. With global warming and associated crises of pollution, habitat and species extinction, new forms of disease, and the ongoing issue of the nuclear, there is a pervasive anxiety about the fate of the earth and, with it, life itself. How can ecocritical thought grapple with this “great unraveling,” as ecotheorist Joanna Macy has put it? This seminar will engage significant works in anthropology, ecocriticism, philosophy, literature, political thought, and art to help us think about this central question.  Readings will include works by Morton, Bonneuil and Fressoz, Bennett, Zizek, Kohn, Descola, Stengers, Haraway, Latour, Macy, and others. Enrollment is limited to 15.  The permission of the instructor is required.

 

COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

 

Anthropology/History GU4001x THE ANCIENT EMPIRES 3 Pts.  Instructor:  Terence D'Altroy. This course provides a comparative study of five of the world's most prominent ancient empires: Rome, Egypt, Qin/Han China, the Aztecs, and the Inkas. The developmental histories of those polities, and their essential sociopolitical, economic, and ideological features, are examined in light of theories of the nature of early empires and methods of studying them. Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement. Undergraduate recitation required. Enrollment is limited to 100.

 

Anthropology GU4345x NEANDERTHAL ALTERITIES.  3 Pts.  Instructor:  Brian Boyd.  Using The Neanderthals partly as a metaphorical device, this course considers the anthropological, philosophical and ethical implications of sharing the world with another human species. Beginning from a solid grounding in the archaeological, biological and genetic evidence, we will reflect critically on why Neanderthals are rarely afforded the same reflexive capacities, qualities and attributes - agency- as anatomically modern humans, and why they are often regarded as lesser or nonhuman animals despite clear evidence for both sophisticated material and social engagement with the world and its resources. Readings/materials are drawn from anthropology, philosophy, ethics, gender studies, race and genetics studies, literature and film. Course open to graduate & advanced undergraduate (3rd & 4th Years) students only.  Enrollment is limited to 25 and the instructor’s approval is required.    

 

COURSES IN MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY:

 

Anthropology GR5361x ETHICAL ISSUES IN MUSEUMS.  3 Pts. Instructor: Sally Yerkovich.  Ethical questions about museum activities are legion, yet they used to be only discussed outside of museums when they became headlines in the media. Have recent events changed this? And will museums change in response to the pandemic and the employment inequities it brought to light? the realization that we urgently need to address climate change and create sustainable institutions? calls for diversity, equity, and inclusion? demands for transparency about finances and sources of support? This course will explore ethical issues that arise in all areas of a museum's operations from governance, leadership, management, and sponsorship to collections acquisition, conservation, and deaccessioning. We will examine the issues that arise when the ownership of objects in a museum's collections is questioned: how museums are responding to requests for restitution and repatriation and what decolonization means for museums. Required for all Museum Anthropology M.A. students.  Graduate seminar – all students other than Museum Anthropology students must get the professor’s approval to attend.  Enrollment limited to 14 students.

 

Anthropology GR6352x MUSEUM ANTHROP: HIST & THEORY. 3 Pts.  Instructor:  Brian Boyd.  This course will consider museums as reflectors of social priorities which store important objects and display them in ways that present significant cultural messages. Students visit several New York museums to learn how a museum functions.  Required: MUSA students. Other graduate students MUST have the permission of the instructor.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

Anthropology GR6652x MUSA DIGITAL MEDIA, MATERIALITY & PRACTICE. 3 pts. Instructor:  Marco Castro.  Class sessions will include the discussion of assigned readings, multimedia, and digital resources, as well as short lectures. Each student will co-lead one discussion section during the term. During most classes there will be presentation and discussion of student assignments. In this course we will learn how to digitally map and visualize museum systems and use this knowledge to facilitate a visitors journey from thinking to making. In the first part of the semester readings, class discussion and weekly “experiments” will be used to investigate how mapping, sketching, and modeling techniques can help develop sustainable frameworks for exhibition. In the second part of the semester we will begin modeling solutions and use these models to refine the way we communicate them to various stakeholders and audiences. Ultimately, the course aims to help students clearly articulate their thinking, explore ways of planning and communicating solutions and develop new models of engagement and action in an exhibition context. The class will combine lectures, seminars, field observation and prototyping.

 

SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH COURSES:

 

Anthropology GR9101x RESEARCH IN SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY.  3-9 Pts.  STAFF.  Individual research and tutorial in archaeology for advanced graduate students. Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Enrollment is limited to 10.

 

Anthropology GR9102x RESEARCH IN ARCHAEOLOGY. 3-9 pts.  STAFF.  Individual research and tutorial in archaeology for advanced graduate students. Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Enrollment is limited to 10.

 

Anthropology GR9103x RESEARCH IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3-9 Pts.  Instructor:  Ralph Holloway.  Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Individual research and tutorial in physical anthropology for advanced graduate students.  Enrollment is limited to 8.

 

Anthropology GR9105x RESEARCH IN SPECIAL FIELDS.  3-9 Pts.  STAFF. Individual research and tutorial in archaeology for advanced graduate students. Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Enrollment is limited to 10.

 

Anthropology GR9112x RSCH IN ARCHEOL METHOD/THEORY. 3-9 Pts.  STAFF. Individual research and tutorial in archaeological method and theory for advanced graduate students.  Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

Anthropology GR9999x WEDNESDAY SEMINAR.  0 Pts.  Instructor:  Nadia Abu El-Haj.  Reports of ongoing research are presented by staff members, students, and special guests.  All anthropology graduate students are required to attend.  Enrollment is limited to 40.

 

 

 


For full listings of frequently taught courses in the Departments of Anthropology at Columbia and Barnard, visit the pages dedicated to 'Frequently Taught Undergraduate Courses' and 'Frequently Taught Graduate Courses.'