Courses - Spring 2022

Detailed descriptions of Undergraduate and Graduate courses may be found under the accordion headings below. Additional information and registration details, including days and times, and classroom locations, may be obtained from the Course Directory and Vergil.


 

COURSE LISTINGS

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology UN1002y THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE.  3 pts.  Instructor: Naor Ben-Yehoyada. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies. Enrollment is limited to 90.   Registration for a discussion section is mandatory.  Refer to Directory of Courses http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

Anthropology UN1009y INTRO TO LANGUAGE & CULTURE.  3 pts. Instructor: Mara Elizabeth Green.  This is an introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, it focuses on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment. Enrollment is limited to 20. 

Anthropology UN2005y THE ETHNOGRAPHIC IMAGINATION.  3 pts. Instructor: Omer Shah. Introduction to the theory and practice of “ethnography”—the intensive study of peoples’ lives as shaped by social relations, cultural images, and historical forces. Considers through critical reading of various kinds of texts (classic ethnographies, histories, journalism, novels, films) the ways in which understanding, interpreting, and representing the lived words of people—at home or abroad, in one place or transnationally, in the past or the present—can be accomplished. Discussion section required.  Enrollment is limited to 90.  Registration for a discussion section is mandatory. Refer to Directory of Courses http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

Anthropology UN2141y FRONTIERS IMAGINARIES. 3 pts. Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli.  This course uses primary documents and supplemental readings from two “frontiers” in order to study how colonialism has created different conditions of the ancestral present; how archival “cores” effect the possibility of documenting ancestral heritability; and how text-based documentation mediate how different frontiers are imagined and governed. The course will focus on two frontier regions: the Alpine region of Trentino and the coastal region of the Northern Territory of Australia, centering on the turn of the 18th to 19th century. The course examines the dynamics between colonialism and liberal governance--how the European conquest of the western Atlantic and Pacific continues to transform modes of liberal governance long after the first colonial fleets disgorged their armies, explorers, and settlers. It approaches a turn in the politics of difference by tracking how two sets of clans have moved through historical forms of the ancestral present, namely, changing imaginaries of social form, time, and heritability; and how these imaginaries emerge from and materially sediment into human bodies and the more-than-human world. The clans are, on the one hand, the Simonaz clan, patronym, Povinelli, and Bartolot clan, patronym, Ambrosi from Carisolo, Trentino; and, on the other hand, the totemic clans of the Karrabing that stretch along the coastal region of Anson Bay, Northern Territory, Australia.  Enrollment is limited to 90.

Anthropology BC3102y AFIRCAN URBANISM. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Larkin. This class examines the production and experience of contemporary African urban life.  It examines emerging questions coming out of Africa about the nature of ‘ordinary’ cities; urban informality and the rise of so-called ‘slum urbanism’; urban infrastructures; religions and the production of enclave urbanism; transport and informal labor; and the sensory experience of ordinary urban life.  We will also explore different ways of understanding and representing the city including photography, film, sound, and art. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 29. 

Anthropology UN3160y THE BODY AND SOCIETY. 4 pts. Instructor: Gina Jae. As an introduction to the field of medical anthropology, this seminar addresses themes of health, affliction, and healing across sociocultural domains.  Concerns include critiques of biomedical, epidemiological and other models of disease and suffering; the entwinement of religion and healing; technocratic interventions in healthcare; and the sociomoral underpinnings of human life, death, and survival.  A 1000 level course in Anthropology is recommended as a prerequisite, although not required.  Non-Majors need instructor permission.  Enrollment limited to 16. 

Anthropology UN3465y WOMEN, GENDER POL-MUSLIM WORLD. 4 pts. Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod.  Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia. Course counts towards the Global Core requirement. Enrollment is limited to 90.

Anthropology UN3665y THE POLITICS OF CARE. 4 pts. Instructor: Gina Jae. 4 pts. What are the consequences of entrenched inequalities in the context of care? How might we (re)imagine associated practices as political projects? Wherein lie the origins of utopic and dystopic visions of daily survival? How might we track associated promises and failures as they travel across social hierarchies, nationalities, and geographies of care? And what do we mean when we speak of “care”? These questions define the scaffolding for this course. Our primary goals throughout this semester are threefold.  First, we begin by interrogating the meaning of “care” and its potential relevance as a political project in medical and other domains. Second, we will track care’s associated meanings and consequences across a range of contents, including urban and rural America, an Amazonia borderland, South Africa, France, and Mexico. Third, we will address temporal dimensions of care, as envisioned and experienced in the here-and-now, historically, and in a futuristic world of science fiction. Finally, and most importantly, we will remain alert to the relevance of domains of difference relevant to care, most notably race, gender, class, and species. Upper level seminar. Enrollment is limited to 16.

Anthropology UN3811y TOXIC. 4 pts. Instructor: Vanessa Agard-Jones.  It is no secret by now that we live in a toxic sea. Every day, in every place in this world, we are exposed to an unknown number of contaminants, including those in the places that we live, the air that we breathe, the foods that we eat, the water that we drink, the consumer products that we use, and in the social worlds that we navigate. While we are all exposed, the effects of these exposures are distributed in radically unequal patterns, and histories of racialization, coloniality, and gendered inequality are critical determinants of the risks to wellness that these toxic entanglements entail. Scientists use the term body burden to describe the accumulated, enduring amounts of harmful substances present in human bodies. In this course, we explore the global conditions that give rise to local body burdens, plumbing the history of toxicity as a category, the politics of toxic exposures, and the experience of toxic embodiment. Foregrounding uneven exposures and disproportionate effects, we ask how scientists and humanists, poets and political activists, have understood toxicity as a material and social phenomenon. We will turn our collective attention to the analysis of ethnographies, memoirs, maps, film, and photography, and students will also be charged with creating visual and narrative projects for representing body burden of their own.  Instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 14.  To apply, please contact Professor Agard-Jones at [email protected].

Anthropology UN3835y AIR MATTERS. 4 pts. Instructor: Maria José de Abreu. This course focuses on conceptualizing air across cultures, time and space. If western episteme has long relied on earthbound vocabularies in order to edify its modernizing project, what happens when we set to rethink its basic premises through aerial logics? Can we even suggest adopting an air perspective or point of view without falling back into those very earthbound terms on which knowledge has long been made to be grounded? Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, this course proposes to analyze plural histories of the air that have not been sufficiently acknowledged. Drawing on a variety of cultural and historical examples, each week will entail ungrounding air through a particular subject-matter: medical, legal, war, race, gender, religion, media and technology, pollution and climate change, design, art and architecture, cities and countryside, the future of masks, or exoplanet atmospheres Enrollment is limited to 18.

Anthropology BC3872y SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR II.  4 pts. Instructors: Lesley Sharp, Gina A Jae, Brian Larkin and Camilla Sturm.  Prerequisites: Must complete ANTH BC3871x. Open Only to Barnard Anthropology Senior Majors. Offered every Spring. Discussion of research methods and planning and writing of a Senior Essay in Anthropology will accompany research on problems of interest to students, culminating in the writing of individual Senior Essays. The advisory system requires periodic consultation and discussion between the student and her adviser as well as the meeting of specific deadlines set by the department each semester.  Enrollment is limited to 25.

Anthropology UN3880y LISTENING: AN ETHNOGRAPHY OF SOUND.  4 pts.  Instructor: John Pemberton. We explore the possibilities of an ethnography of sound through a range of listening encounters: in resonant urban soundscapes of the city and in natural soundscapes of acoustic ecology; from audible pasts and echoes of the present; through repetitive listening in the age of electronic reproduction, and mindful listening that retraces an uncanniness inherent in sound. Silence, noise, voice, chambers, reverberation, sound in its myriad manifestations and transmissions.  From the captured souls of Edison’s phonography, to everyday acoustical adventures, the course turns away from the screen and dominant epistemologies of the visual for an extended moment, and does so in pursuit of sonorous objects.  How is it that sound so moves us as we move within its world, and who or what then might the listening subject be?  Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology V3893y THE BOMB.  4 pts. Instructor: Karen Seeley.  This course investigates the social history of nuclear arms in the context of World War II and the Cold War, exploring their ramifications for subjects and societies. We consider historical, ethnographic, medical and psychiatric accounts of the bomb’s invention and fallout, including the unknowable bodily injuries caused by radiation and the ecological contamination inflicted on indigenous communities where atomic weapons were tested. Throughout the course, we investigate government propaganda designed to produce political subjects who both endorse and fear nuclear imperatives; who support expanding militarization and funding for weapons development; and who abide escalating political rhetorics of nuclear aggression. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

ANTH V3933y ARABIA IMAGINED. 4 pts. Instructor: Brinkley Messick. This course explores Arabia as a global phenomenon. It is organized around primary texts read in English translation. The site of the revelation of the Quran and the location of the sacred precincts of Islam, Arabia is the destination of pilgrimage and the direction of prayer for Muslims worldwide. It also is the locus of cultural expression ranging from the literature of the 1001 Nights to the broadcasts of Al Jazeera. We begin with themes of contemporary youth culture and political movements associated with the Arab Spring. Seminar paper.  CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement.  Enrollment limit is 30.

Anthropology V3939y THE ANIME EFFECT: MEDIA AND TECHNOCULTURE IN JAPAN. 4 pts. Instructor: Marilyn Ivy. Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology UN3947y TEXT, MAGIC, PERFORMANCE. 4 pts. Instructor: John Pemberton.  This course pursues interconnections linking text and performance in light of magic, ritual, possession, narration, and related articulations of power. Readings are drawn from classic theoretical writings, colonial fiction, and ethnographic accounts. Domains of inquiry include: spirit possession, trance states, séance, ritual performance, and related realms of cinematic projection, musical form, shadow theater, performative objects, and (other) things that move on their own, compellingly. Key theoretical concerns are subjectivity - particularly, the conjuring up and displacement of self in the form of the first-person singular I - and the haunting power of repetition. Retraced throughout the course are the uncanny shadows of a fully possessed subject --within ritual contexts and within everyday life. This course counts towards the Global Core requirement. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology UN3998y SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH. 2-6 pts. Staff. Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.  Refer to the Director of Courses for a list of sections: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.

Anthropology UN3999y SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY.  4 pts.  Instructor:  Zoe Crossland.  Prerequisites: The instructors permission. Students must have declared a major in Anthropology prior to registration. Students must have a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to be considered. Interested students must communicate/meet with thesis instructor in the previous spring about the possibility of taking the course during the upcoming academic year. Additionally, expect to discuss with the instructor at the end of the fall term whether your project has progressed far enough to be completed in the spring term. If it has not, you will exit the seminar after one semester, with a grade based on the work completed during the fall term. This two-term course is a combination of a seminar and a workshop that will help you conduct research, write, and present an original senior thesis in anthropology. Students who write theses are eligible to be considered for departmental honors. The first term of this course introduces a variety of approaches used to produce anthropological knowledge and writing; encourages students to think critically about the approaches they take to researching and writing by studying model texts with an eye to the ethics, constraints, and potentials of anthropological research and writing; and gives students practice in the seminar and workshop formats that are key to collegial exchange and refinement of ideas. During the first term, students complete a few short exercises that will culminate in a substantial draft of one discrete section of their senior project (18-20 pages) plus a detailed outline of the expected work that remains to be done (5 pages). The spring sequence of the anthropology thesis seminar is a writing intensive continuation of the fall semester, in which students will have designed the research questions, prepared a full thesis proposal that will serve as a guide for the completion of the thesis and written a draft of one chapter. Only those students who expect to have completed the fall semester portion of the course are allowed to register for the spring; final enrollment is contingent upon successful completion of first semester requirements. In spring semester, weekly meetings will be devoted to the collaborative refinement of drafts, as well as working through issues of writing (evidence, voice, authority etc.). All enrolled students are required to present their project at a symposium in the late spring, and the final grade is based primarily on successful completion of the thesis/ capstone project.  Enrollment limit is 15. Requirements: Students must have completed the requirements of the first semester of the sequence and seek instructor approval to enroll in the second.

Anthropology GU4123y HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY.  4 pts.  Instructor: Brinkley Messick.  This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approaches of historical anthropology, in sources, methods and conceptualizations. In the development of this subfield one can track the general development of the discipline of Anthropology from an original expertise in the oral texts of non-literate societies to the contemporary interest in literate textual traditions.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

Anthropology UN2028y THINK LIKE AN ARCHAEOLOGIST: INTRODUCTION TO METHOD AND THEORY. 3 pts. Instructor: Hannah Chazin. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to methods and theory in archaeology – by exploring how archaeologists work to create narratives about the past (and the present) on the basis on the material remains of the past. The course begins with a consideration of how archaeologists deal with the remains of the past in the present: What are archaeological sites and how do we ‘discover’ them? How do archaeologists ‘read’ or analyze sites and artifacts? From there, we will turn to the question of how archaeologists interpret these materials traces, in order to create narratives about life in the past. After a review of the historical development of theoretical approaches in archaeological interpretation, the course will consider contemporary approaches to interpreting the past.  Enrollment is limited to 60.  $25 Anthropology Lab Fee.

Anthropology UN3007y HOLY LANDS, UNHOLY HISTORIES: ARCHAEOLOGY BEFORE THE BIBLE. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Boyd. This course provides (1) a critical overview of the politics of archaeology in the Middle East, particularly Palestine-Israel, and (2) a detailed survey of the prehistory of the region from earliest times to the beginnings of settled village life around 8000 years ago. It is designed to appeal not only to archaeologists, but also to historians, and to students interested in both the Ancient Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Studies. By the end of the course, students should be aware of the major issues and debates which characterize the archaeology of the region, and should have a good grasp of the historical and political circumstances under which Middle Eastern prehistory has developed over the past 150 years. Enrollment is limited to 30.

Anthropology BC3223y GENDER ARCHAEOLXGY. 3 pts. Instructor: Camilla Sturm. This seminar critically reexamines the ancient world from the perspective of gender archaeology. Though the seedlings of gender archaeology were first sown by of feminist archaeologists during the 70’s and 80’s, this approach involves far more than simply ‘womanizing’ androcentric narratives of past. Rather, gender archaeology criticizes interpretations of the past that transplant contemporary social roles onto the archaeological past, casting the divisions and inequalities of today as both timeless and natural. This class challenges the idea of a singular past, instead championing a turn towards multiple, rich, messy, intersectional pasts. The ‘x’ in ‘archaeolxgy’ is an explicit signal of our focus on this diversity of pasts and a call for a more inclusive field of practice today.  

Anthropology GU4481y SCI & ART IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION. 4 pts. Instructor: Zoe Crossland and Co-instructor: Tracy Molis. Archaeology has provided a rich imaginative resource for many artists, who have found inspiration in the discipline’s material engagement with the past, its evocation of absent presences, and its strange juxtaposition of practical activity and textual narrative. In this course we continue the exploration of art’s intersections with archaeology, but we take an alternate starting point. Scientific illustration has been a key part of archaeological work since the discipline’s origins in the antiquarian investigations of the 16th and 17th centuries. These antiquarian records drew upon techniques that were elaborated during the Renaissance and many of these illustrative forms remain relevant today. Enrollment is limited to 17.

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGICAL/PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4148y HUMAN SKELETAL BIOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Ralph Holloway.  Recommended for archaeology and physical anthropology students, pre-meds, and biology majors interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of bones. Other primate skeletal materials and fossil casts used for comparative study.   Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.  Enrollment is limited to 8.

 

CROSS-LISTED CLASSES:

HISTORY UN2978y SCIENCE AND PSEUDOSCIENCE.  4 pts.  Instructors:  Pamela Smith and Stuart J. Firestein.  During the 2020 US presidential election and the years of the COVID-19 pandemic, science and “scientific truths” were fiercely contested. This course provides a historical perspective on the issues at stake. The course begins with an historical account of how areas of natural knowledge, such as astrology, alchemy, and “natural magic,” which were central components of an educated person’s view of the world in early modern Europe, became marginalized, while a new philosophy of nature (what we would now call empirical science) came to dominate the discourse of rationality. Historical developments examined in this course out of which this new understanding of nature emerged include the rise of the centralized state, religious reform, and European expansion. The course uses this historical account to show how science and pseudoscience developed in tandem in the period from 1400 to 1800. This historical account equips students to examine contemporary issues of expertise, the social construction of science, pluralism in science, certainty and uncertainty in science, as well as critical engagement with contemporary technologies.  Enrollment is limited to 75. 

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN SOCIOCULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4123y HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 4 pts. Instructor: Brinkley Messick.  This is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approaches of historical anthropology, in sources, methods and conceptualizations. In the development of this subfield one can track the general development of the discipline of Anthropology from an original expertise in the oral texts of non-literate societies to the contemporary interest in literate textual traditions.  Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GU4132y MENTAL HEALTH & ILLNESS IN POST/SOC.  4 pts. Instructor: Svetlana Borodina.  This seminar takes mental health and illness in socialist and postsocialist countries as objects of anthropological investigation. It explores the ways in which mental health care, diagnostics, suffering, and therapeutic systems are constituted by and constitutive of the post/socialist cultural, political, and socioeconomic contexts. Topics include critical approaches to psychiatric diagnostics; the development of the Soviet psychiatric complex, neuropharmaceuticals, and addiction treatment practice; the constitution and treatment of mental disabilities; institutional and communal mental healthcare; deinstitutionalization; experimental treatments; healing and injurious socioeconomic and political forces; social abandonment and death. Class readings will present a mixture of theoretical texts and ethnographic/historical material from post/socialist regions. Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GR6055y SECOND-YEAR DOCTORAL PROPOSAL SEMINAR. 3 pts. Instructor: Audra Simpson. Prerequisites: 2ND YEAR PHD STATUS IN GOOD STANDING.  Corequisites: ANTH G6205 Within this seminar, one will master the art of research design and proposal writing, with special emphasis on the skills involved in writing a dissertation prospectus and research proposals that target a range of external funding sources. Foci include: bibliography development; how one crafts and defends a research problem; the parameters of human subjects research - certification; and the key components of grant proposal design. Required of, and limited to, all Second Year PHD anthropology students.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

Anthropology GR6067y LANGUAGE AND ITS LIMITS.  3 pts.  Instructor:  Elizabeth M Green.  Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 12. 

Anthropology GR6079y READING, WRITING, ETHNOGRAPHY.  3 pts.  Instructor: Rosalind Morris.  “Reading, Writing, Ethnography” undertakes a survey of exemplary texts in order to explore the histories, genre conventions and experimental forms for writing ethnography.  The course focuses on the monograph form, and is especially concerned with the ways in which empirical observation is made the ground of theoretical abstraction and generalizing claims. Additionally, it examines the relationship between different theoretical and aesthetic movements as these have influenced the writings of anthropologists and those whose work can be considered to have an anthropological ambition—even when they have not been formally trained in anthropology.  We will examine the influence of various modernisms—realist and surrealist—on the discipline, as well as the sometimes awkward relations between structuralist, psychoanalytic, and postcolonial theory as they have (and have not) been realized in the writing projects of ethnographers.  Enrollment is limited to 15.

Anthropology GR6102y SEMIOTICS ANTHROPOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli.  This course examines the canonical texts of modern semiology and semiotics from the perspective of anthropological methods and theories. Beginning with an extensive examination of the works of Ferdinand de Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce, the course examines the theoretical elaborations and movements of structuralism and pragmatism through the 1960s. The instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 25.

Anthropology GR6157y IDEA OF A BLACK RADICAL TRADITION.  3 pts.  Instructor: David Scott.  This course will seek to raise and think through the following questions: What does it mean to talk today about a black radical tradition? What has it meant in the past to speak in these (or cognate) terms? And if we take the debate in part at least to inhabit a normative discursive space, an argumentative space in which to make claims on the moral-political present, what ought it to mean to talk about a black radical tradition?  Enrollment is limited to 16.

Anthropology GR6212y PRIN/APPL-SOC & CULTRL ANTHROPOLOGY.  3 pts.  Instructor: Ellen Marakowitz.  Prerequisites: ANTH G4201 Principles and Applications of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the instructor’s permission. Focus on research and writing for the Masters level thesis, including research design, bibliography and background literature development, and writing. Prerequisites: ANTH G4201 Principles and Applications of Social and Cultural Anthropology.  Enrollment is limited to 18.

Anthropology GR6227y ETHNOGRAHPIES AT THE END OF THE WORLD.  3 pts. Instructor: Juan Carlos Mazariegos.  What can we learn from anthropological and ethnographic research in and about a damaged world, a world confronted by the violence and effects of war, climate change, transnational migration, post-industrial abandonment, and the lives and afterlives of colonialism and slavery? What are the ethnographic debates that address the catastrophes produced by capitalism and the lifeforms that emerge out of its ruins? What types of anthropological critique emerge in times enunciated as ‘the end of the world’? And what comes after this end? Ethnographies at the End of the World addresses these questions by paying close attention to some of the most relevant debates in contemporary anthropological theory and anthropological critique. These debates include, among others, discussions on violence and trauma, the politics of life and death, the work of memory and oblivion, and the material entanglements between human and non-human forms of existence. The aim of this seminar is to generate a discussion around the multiple implications of these theoretical arrangements and how anthropologists deploy them in their ethnographic understandings of the world we live in. In doing so, this course provides students with a fundamental understanding and conceptual knowledge about how anthropologists use and produce theory, and how this theoretical production is mobilized as a social critique. This course is reading intensive and operates in the form of a seminar. It is intended, primarily, for MA students in the department of anthropology and graduate students in other departments. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR6305y ART, AESTHETICS & THE POLITICAL. 3 pts. Instructor: Marilyn Ivy. Cross-disciplinary in inspiration, this seminar engages work in anthropology, art criticism, literary studies, aesthetics, and philosophy to think about the political possibilities of art and the aesthetic dimensions of the political. Focusing most sharply (but not exclusively) on what is variously called socially engaged art, relational art, or participatory art, the seminar will consider recent art practices, performances, texts, and objects across a diverse range of genres and national-cultural locations. Art thinkers studied will include Kant, Benjamin, Adorno, Lyotard, Ranciere, Kitagawa, García-Canclini, Groys, Bishop, Bourriard, and beyond. Instructor’s permission is required. Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology GR6345y POETICS & POLIT-INFRASTRUCTURE. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Larkin.  Infrastructures are the material forms that allow for the possibility of exchange over space, invisible conduits that comprise the technical architecture that allow urban spaces to form and creates grounds for the circulation that ties those spaces to larger grids. But bodies of recent scholarship have come to interrogate the ways in which infrastructures comprise the conditions of existence for social experience, political action and economic order. This class seeks to examine what an analysis of infrastructure might add to anthropological analysis. Drawing from anthropology, science studies, media theory and history we will analyze the technical conditions of infrastructures, the legal regulations they give rise to, the political action they generate and the forms of everyday life they enable. Students need to attend the first class to finalize enrollment. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 13.

Anthropology GR9999y WEDNESDAY SEMINAR. 0 pts. Instructor: Catherine Fennell.  All anthropology graduate students are required to attend. Reports of ongoing research are presented by staff members, students, and special guests. Notes: Only Anthropology PhDs in residence are required to register. Enrollment is limited to 15.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY:

Anthropology GU4481y SCI & ART IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL ILLUSTRATION. 4 pts. Instructor: Zoe Crossland and co-instructor: Tracy Molis. Archaeology has provided a rich imaginative resource for many artists, who have found inspiration in the discipline’s material engagement with the past, its evocation of absent presences, and its strange juxtaposition of practical activity and textual narrative. In this course we continue the exploration of art’s intersections with archaeology, but we take an alternate starting point. Scientific illustration has been a key part of archaeological work since the discipline’s origins in the antiquarian investigations of the 16th and 17th centuries. These antiquarian records drew upon techniques that were elaborated during the Renaissance and many of these illustrative forms remain relevant today. Enrollment is limited to 17.

Anthropology GR6051y VALUE, OBJECTS, AND MEANING.  3 pts.  Instructor: Hannah Chazin.  This course explores how anthropologists have engaged with the question of value as means of understanding and comparing human social engagement with the creation, circulation, and consumption of objects and ideas. In doing so, this course will read classical anthropological texts concerned with exchange, social meaning and action and consider a variety of topics of anthropological interest such as gifts, commodities, capitalism, inequality, and the relationships between humans and nonhumans of many kinds. The course traces how questions and arguments that emerged out of earlier debates in “economic” anthropology were taken up and altered in later conversations about the analytical importance and utility of material and semiotic approaches. In doing so, the course explores what these genealogies might say about the possibility of, and the potential usefulness or desirability of, a contemporary or future-looking anthropology of value.  Enrollment is limited to 18.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GR6192y EXHIBITION PRAC-GLOBAL CONTEXT. 3 pts. Instructor: David Harvey. This course addresses the practical challenges entailed in the process of creating a successful exhibition. Developing an actual curatorial project, students will get an opportunity to apply the museum anthropology theory they are exposed to throughout the program. They will be given a hands-on approach to the different stages involved in the curation of a show, from the in-depth researching of a topic to the writing, editing and design of an exhibition that will be effective for specific audiences. Prerequisites: ANTH G6352 Museum Anthropology: history and theory / ANTH G6353 Politics and Practice of Museum Exhibitions; G9110, G9111 and the instructor’s permission. Corequisites: ANTH G6353. Museum Anthropology M.A. students have priority. Others must have the permission of the instructor No undergraduates allowed to register. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR6365y EXHIBITION CULTURES.  3 pts. Instructor: Laurel Kendall. This course is a continuation of Museum Anthropology G6352 (not a prerequisite). Through the study of museum exhibitions, this course explores a series of debates about the representation of culture in museums, the politics of identity, and the significance of objects. We will consider the museum as a contemporary and variable form, as a site for the expression of national, group, and individual identity and as a site of performance and consumption. We will consider how exhibits are developed, what they aim to convey, what makes them effective (or not), and how they sometimes become flashpoints of controversy. Because the work of museums is visual, enacted through the display of material forms, we will also consider the transformation of objects into artifacts and as part of exhibitions, addressing questions of meaning, ownership, value, and magic. We will look at this range of issues from the point of view of practitioners, critics, and audiences. In collaboration with G6352, students develop a small AMNH exhibit; this year we will focus on a Tibetan Thangka painting (AMNH #70.3/8090) to explore contemporary Thangkas and those who paint them. Museum Anthropology M.A. students have priority to enroll. Others must have Instructor permission. No undergraduates permitted to enroll. Enrollment is limited to 20.

Anthropology GR9110y MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP I. 3 pts.  Instructor: Brian Boyd. An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs. /week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs. /week (for 6). Involves meaningful work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

Anthropology GR9111y MUSEUM ANTHROPOLOGY INTERNSHIP II. 3 pts. Instructor: Brian Boyd. An internship arranged through the Museum Anthropology program of 10 hrs. /week (for 3 credits) or 20 hrs. /week (for 6). Involves meaningful work, requires keeping a journal and writing a paper at the completion of the semester. Not to be taken without permission of the program directors, usually after completing the Museum Anthropology core courses. Instructor’s permission is required.  Enrollment is limited to 10.

 

GRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGICAL/PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY:

Anthropology GR4148y HUMAN SKELETAL BIOLOGY II. 3 pts. Instructor: Ralph Holloway. Recommended for archaeology and physical anthropology students, pre-meds, and biology majors interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of bones. Other primate skeletal materials and fossil casts used for comparative study.  Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 8.

For a list of Graduate Independent Research Courses, Please refer to the Directory of Classes at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/.


For full listings of frequently taught courses in the Departments of Anthropology at Columbia and Barnard, visit the pages dedicated to 'Frequently Taught Undergraduate Courses' and 'Frequently Taught Graduate Courses.'